Nicole Welch Transcript

John Corcoran Transcript
Ray Ortega Interview Transcription

“I think, deep down, we're all a little crazy if we really tapped into it.”

Harry:
Podcast Junkies, we are officially 25 episodes old, quarter of a century, high-five to us.

Thanks for joining us. We have Nicole Welch in today's episode and we met Podcast Movement as well. Common trend in the past couple of episodes. Similar to how John Corcoran and I talked about the power of networking. We talk similarly with Nicole about the power of podcasting. She also a coach and communications/psychology expert. She teaches sociology at college and she's also lived in Honduras for three years helping coach gang members. So, she's really got an interesting past.

I think a lot of that experience goes into her show. She just knack for getting real conversations out of men. She's had folks like Srinivas Rao, Jordan Harbinger on the show. She's just really, brings a lot of energy to everything she does. This episode is no different. She's also a fan of Tim Ferriss and talk about Tony Robbins as well and some of the inspirational feedback and messages that they give us, but she's just a genuine person and we've got really good chemistry. We also have some fun on the show. I think, I know, you'll enjoy this episode. Send me any feedback you have through the site or through a comment on the show notes page. PodcastJunkies.com/25. Enjoy.

So, thanks for coming on Podcast Junkies, Nicole!

Nicole:
I know, so excited. I just love the name, Podcast Junkies.

Harry:
Everyone usually has a good reaction when they hear it, so it was just inspired from New Media Expo. That Ah-ha moment.

Nicole:
Nice and I like that you keep your names, because you just told me the name of the other one that you're going to do.

Harry:
Yeah.

Nicole:
I don't know if I should let the cat out of the bag.

Harry:
Yeah, sure.

Nicole:
Productivity Sauce. It's kind of saucy. I like it that you keep it to two words. I like that.

Harry:
Makes the logo design a bit easier.

Nicole:
Yeah, there's something about twos in titles that should be. I mean, I should take my own advice. Mine's like way too long. Real Time, Real Men Only, but *Laughter*.

Harry:
Do people every mentioned the Bill Maher show?

Nicole:
No.

Harry:
When they talk about their show?

Nicole:
No.

Harry:
Bill Maher is Real Time with Bill Maher, I think it is or something like that.

Nicole:
Is it? Well, real time is very used. I've seen it in TV video production stuff. No, I haven't heard of that.

Harry:
How many permutations of the podcast did you go through before you landed on this one?

Nicole:
Like, not many. I'm just do it and just get it going and I'll go work the kinks out as I go. I'm so unlike other podcasters where they're like perfectionists and even talking with you, you're like,”I'm going to test this. I'm going to go through..” You know. I'm not like that at all. I'm just going to launch it. If I don't like it.. I mean, John Lee Dumas did kind of encourage me, he's like, “You don't like the logo.” He's like, “It took me 2 years to work on my logo and just change it.” And I was like, “Yeah. My logo. I didn't have anything, really.” I'm still evolving with stuff, but I'm more into the content and talking to interesting people that I just don't really care.

Harry:
I think at the end of the day, I found several folks in John's program have had a lot of success, namely Chris Cerrone, he was proud of his janky artwork. *Laughter*.

Nicole:
Yes, yes.

Harry:
For the longest time. He just celebrated episode 100, so it didn't slow him down.

Nicole:
Yeah, it's just kind of what your personality is I think and your motives or agenda behind what you're doing it. Mine always is evolving and always unfolding and meeting new and interesting people. It's been great.

Harry:
Are you taking the lessons that you're learning from the podcast back into the class room, because you teach sociology, right?

Nicole:
I teach sociology, yeah. I do. Yes, I am actually. It's been really weird. You were talking earlier about doors opening for ideas that you had and products and stuff that you're working on and I have always loved public speaking. My goal is to do a TED talk, I mean I'll start with TEDx, but I really wanna do a TED talk. I've done research in the past and that's kind of more my stuff, psychology-background studying people.

So, I have noticed with the podcasting, I definitely take what I do to the classroom and even in the classroom I bring to the podcast. It's kinda cool and all these doors have opened up for public speaking gigs here in Florida. As a musician, I still call it gigs, but I don't know what people call them. I think they call them gigs, but I never..I'm using that word a lot and other people don't, so maybe they're not calling it that. I don't know, I just love it. I love having that energy. I mean, I can do it audio as well, but I really like having the people infront of me and like face-to-face. We have a studio here at the office and I'll have people come over and we'll have fun. Drinks and beer.

Harry:
What part of Florida?

Nicole:
Lakeland.

Harry:
Lakeland? Okay.

Nicole:
In between Orlando and Tampa, most people are like, “Uhhh. Lakeland, where is that?” I'm actually from Orlando.

Harry:
Do you know Vernon Foster?

Nicole:
I do.

Harry:
Yeah.

Nicole:
I do, I listened to his episode. I listened to his episode with you. I love Vernon and he's in Guatemala now!

Harry:
And you were in Honduras.

Nicole:
I was in Honduras and me and him were chatting about that. *Laughter*. He needed some good food from me, he's eating good food now. Yeah.

Harry:
So, talk a little a bit about your Honduras adventure.

Nicole:
Well, whenever I do public speaking gigs. I always tell people, real short, I keep it very short, my intro; I keep it about 30 seconds and I say, “Well,” I love saying that, “Host and creator of a nationally syndicated podcast.” And they're all looking like, “What's a podcast?” *Laughter*. Then I say, “Internet radio,” I like to say the word national, then I say, “I've worked with gang members, mentally ill, and business entrepreneurs and the one thing they all have in common,” and they're all like, “What? What do they all have in common?” You know?

Harry:
Yeah, dramatic pauses.

Nicole:
Very dramatic intro of my bio. It's really the only way I can sum up my experience and not go on and on about myself for 15 minutes like most people do. So, I just, say that. Yeah, so what we did was we got together with USAid and met some people. Really, we had brought a girl over here who needed surgery. She was like dying. A judge in Orlando, a friend of ours, helped us get her the surgery for free and it was very long, tedious thing, so we went back there for a week.

I remember walking there with my husband going, “There's no way I could live here. This place is a dump!” *Laughter*. We'd get on the plane and there for a week, we were sick for half the week, because dehydrated or got some horrible disease, intestinal. So he's like, “Oh my gosh, I'm so excited. We're going to come back and we're going to move here. We're going to build houses and we're just gonna live here!” and I'm like, “Surrre, we are. Yeah, okay, honey.”

Harry:
Was that the first time in a third world country?

Nicole:
It was my..yes It was my first time. I had been..I'm trying to think I've been out of the country before that, but it wasn't anything like that. So, yes. It definitely..And we were like in one of the poorest towns. It wasn't even like going to the capital and hanging out there and doing like.. We were in like a very, very poor time. Like, one of the poorest ones in Honduras, Choluteca. So, yeah. I remember we moved 5 months later, we moved down there. Like, it was crazy. So, as far as like, shotgun people, you know, the ready, aim, fire, we were kind of like the opposite. We just aim later.

Harry:
Ready, fire, aim?

Nicole:
*Laughter*. Yeah. We did that and then we wound up, doors opening, starting a team challenge for the gang members that were there, which are, the gang members over there are very, very different than gang members here. Mix California gangs, although you guys have them there, the MS..the Mara Salvatrucha, we have the 18 Street gangs. So we had both those and we were the only program that mixed them.

Harry:
Wow.

Nicole:
They had killed people, they had left people on the..I mean, their stories were pretty crazy. It was just amazing to see, kind of how the program and what we did, I mean, we built it from the ground up. It was cool. It was very entrepreneurial. So, mentally ill and gang members and entrepreneurs do have stuff in common whether they believe it or not. *Laughter*.

Harry:
That's funny, because you say it's entrepreneurial. I mean, it was entrepreneurial in nature, but I think there's certain challenges or certain challenges that you were worried about like, “Man, I hope we don't bring the two wrong gangs into this meeting.” As opposed to, “Hey, does my logo artwork look good?” *Laughter*.

Nicole:
Yes, yes. There was some different perspectives as far as..yes. Definitely. There was a few times I was worried or concerned about my safety. They did machete our truck and that was about it, they didn't machete us, so that was good.

Harry:
I actually have an interesting machete story, so I don't know if I told you.

Nicole:
Oooh. Let's hear it.

Harry:
I don't know if I told you that I'm Salvadorian.

Nicole:
Ahh. See, I was asking Gavin tonight, do you remember where Harry's from? Is he from..I was trying to pin-point maybe Colombia, but then I thought maybe he's Costa Rican or Central America, not sure.

Harry:
Yeah, so. My wife's Colombian actually. So, we do have a mix here.

Nicole:
Oh okay! Salvador.

Harry:
So, I was born there, but I came here when I was 10 months old. I'm more like a new-ra-rican.

Nicole:
Right, it's still in your blood.

Harry:
I must have a Spanish bug, because I got there and was like, “These people look nothing like me.” *Laughter*.

Nicole:
*Laughter*. Yeah, that's true.

Harry:
It's funny, there's picture's of my older brother and he looks like the little dutch boy in the paint can. Like, little like Arian race guy. Little bob, yellow bob, hair cut with piercing blue eyes and I'm like, “Wow. I haven't seen any of those either.”

Nicole:
Wow. That's so funny.

Harry:
Well, I did go back finally, probably over 10 years ago now and just to see the motherland. I was wondering if I'd have some sort of connection. I consider myself a citizen of the world, so I don't really tend to cling on to specific locations as my identity. So, we went there and we got a little bit of family there. We tried to do some sightseeing, but we'd go to these overlooked places and you just see the shady characters with a machete hanging on. We go up the hill, then they come up the hill, and we head out to the overlook and they come over to the overlook. I'm like, “Ahh. They're following us and they've got a machete it so..sightseeing time is over.”

Nicole:
*Laughter*. Yeah, we're out of here. We don't want to be in the jungles and mountains up here after dark for sure.

Harry:
It's a strange feeling. It's similar to if you're in a shady part of an urban town.

Nicole:
It is. Very much so.

Harry:
Yeah, I guess that feeling of being in another country where it's like, “Hey, police.” and like a cops going to show up is a better chance of happening in an urban zone as oppose to a third world country mountain side

Nicole:
So true. So true. I will say the things that we learned, I mean, man. Did we learn and man, my husband has been on a couple of other podcasts and interviewed and we'll both say the same thing. The stuff we learned will change you forever. Like, forever. Just coming from an American citizen mentality and going to another world and seeing about relationships and connections and you know, all of that, I feel like just really blessed to be able back to podcasting or business or coaching or whatever it is, even selling a product.

It's like, there's so much, so much to it. I think having the psy background as well and teaching at the school, it definitely helps and some of the businesses we had in the past. We had a drilling business, so I had, I really worked with men all the time. So, that's kind of why *Laughter*, I was like, I'm going to do this podcast for men, just in general. I was so close to my bother growing up and it's like, I was one of the guys, but I'm a female and I just, totally get their perspective, because I'm always around them or working with them. Even getting to know the gang members, it was just amazing to hear their stories and how they grew up as men and the masculinity thing in a third country being raised by their mom and grandma. It's just amazing. I was like, you know what, I'm gonna do this show and I'm going to be a female host, and oh well! *Laughter*.

Harry:
Yeah, I mean why not. If you have so much experience with it and you've interacted with men on that level, it just seems like a perfect fit to do a show like that.

Nicole:
Yeah, it's fun. I love it. I have wonderful female, close friends. I mean, great friends, very tight, and I've had them for years. That's the other thing, I wanted the show to be about sustainability and longevity, relationships, businesses, you know, whatever it is. We just celebrated 17 years of being married and so,

Harry:
Congrads.

Nicole:
Gosh, I lived with one guy for so long, *Laughter*. I still am in love with him and still want him and all those things that you know, a lot of other people who have been married for 17 years are pretty miserable.

So, I'm thinking, you know? I think I know a little bit, I mean, and I wanted the podcast. I was really trying to gear up toward communication as well and learning a foreign language. When my son was born, he had speech problem for years, like 3-4 years. So I thought, communication is huge, is huge where ever you go. Cross-culturally, business, you know. I wanted to kind of tie that in. I mean, I'm still trying to tie that in with the guests and with their stories. It's an interesting road I'm learning as I go. It's been fun.

Harry:
Do you think people need to do that more to get out their comfort zone and do something, maybe not as dramatic as travel to a third world country, but do something that's different than their day to day norm in order to see a perspective that's different than their own?

Nicole:
Absolutely. I would tell them, if you're not a religious, go to some super, kind of hostel or go as an Caucasian, we went to an all black church. My friend invited me. I mean, this was like a traditional all black church. It was so cool. It was like the best experience. I tell people, you know, being in sociology and psychology, I've done research in strip clubs before and interviewed the girls there. I mean, it's so, it's uncomfortable. I mean, we tried getting into Rachael's down in Orlando and they wouldn't let us in because we didn't actually have a man accompanying us into the fine establishment.

Harry:
Yeah.

Nicole:
The gentleman's club. So, we were kind of ticked off about that. We wanted to go to that one, because it's a little higher end. We wound up going to Circus Circus, which I think I might believe is still in Orlando. I don't how familiar with Florida you are, but I know L.As got it's own finer establishments too.

Harry:
I'm sure.

Nicole:
But, it was so cool. It was uncomfortable for me. I remember it was for my masters and I remember thinking, “Oh my god. What am I going to talk to these girls about?” Man, to hear their stories, like I've been interviewing people a long time way before I started podcasting. *Laughter*. It's just so cool. I don't think you have to do anything that drastic, but I think yes, I think you need to do something, you know.

Even going to a place where you're going to meet new people, even for mas a extroverted as I am, it's still can be intimating depending on who's there or what it's about or whatever. It's like you have to walk through that intimation or fear and just go with it and get out of your comfort zone and make a conversation and meet people. The best advice I think Dave Delaney said one time, he's a huge networker with business networking and he was like, “Get out of your house and go somewhere you wouldn't normally go. Instead of going to the same Starbucks, go somewhere to some little hole in the wall cafe and find out what happens.”

Harry:
You can do it incrementally too, like you said, go to a different Starbucks to start if that's the extent to which you're willing to push yourself. It's funny because we're in this podcasting circle and we go into something like Podcast Movement and we see everyone there and we'll like, “Oh, we're all podcasters.” I'm sure someone who had maybe just started shows up and they're like, “Oh..there's Nicole, I'd love to say something to hear, but I'm afraid.” We have our own people, because I know you're specifically a Tim Ferriss fan girl.

Nicole:
Huuuuge Tim Ferriss fan. Yes. Large Tim Ferriss and Jame Altucher. Right now, I'm enamored with James Altucher. Hopefully he's listening to your podcast.

Harry:
We'll have to make the introduction.

Nicole:
Yes. I need!

Harry:
I'm not saying I could do it, but *Laughter*.

Nicole:
Well, I was just telling Johnny Andrews, I said, “He wrote me back!” I was so excited. It was funny. I was listening to Noah Kagan talking about him. They were interviewing each other or he was..I don't know. And he said, “You know, James, what was the deal? I was at a conference one time and you were like my idol and you totally blew me off.”

I remember hearing that story and it just gave me hope and I was like, yeah. I am a little prone to hero-worship I will say. That was the other thing about the podcast, I wanted people to realize that there are man who are just heroes. Like, the day-to-day guys, you know, like you said, help clean up the kitchen before they start podcasting. You know, like, oh my god, Harry's so sweet. He's helping his wife clean the kitchen, but anyway, those are the heroes that you don't hear about.

Those are the ones, you know, you can look at all the Tim Ferriss in the world, but it's really that guy that's hustling. He's really trying to balance all those areas of his life, his relationships, his business, his money, and think about the future and what he's leaving his legacy behind. I mean, that's one of the questions I ask at the funeral of yourself, which everybody thinks about. What would they say? I mean, are they going to be laughing, are they going to think about, “Wow, he worked his butt off and never saw his family.” I mean, what are they going to say about you?

Harry:
A lot of people, it's like they put thought into that, but it's like too late by the time they do it.

Nicole:
Yes.

Harry:
It's kind of after the fact and I'm like, wow, I wished I would have thought about it. Sometimes even asking the question, at least makes him think about it.

Nicole:
Yeah. I mean, if you're not deliberate..I'm talking about the wealth mindset tomorrow night at this speaking gig and the one thing that I wrote down is the wealthy are deliberate. I mean, Bill Gates isn't teaching his kids to get a good education, get a good job, he's been real deliberate about connecting with people with unlimited resources and just working together and causing movements and making..Yeah, he started out as a small business, went local, went national, then went global.

I just think if we could all look at the bigger picture and see that..I love talk to Michael Stelzner, because he talked a lot about that and just balancing that with his family and knowing when to pull back and go for..there is sacrifice involved. You can't do it all. I mean, a lot of people will promote out there and say you can, but that's a big fat lie. I mean, you really can't. You have to sacrifice in some areas.

I mean, there were times Gavin and I hustled. We didn't connect for weeks, months, you know, we wouldn't, then we had to be, again, deliberate about, “Okay, we're going away for 2 days and we're just going to not work or pick up our phones and unplug.” I think if you don't do that, you'll burn out health wise too. Even what you're doing, detox, that's awesome, because the most men I'm consoling are coaching. Their health is, you know, got high blood pressure and they're like, 38 *Laughter* or they're not in a relationship or they can't someone to go out, you know, it's just crazy.

Harry:
I think, jumping back part to the relationships, it comes down to communications. You could be busy, you could be extremely busy, but if you're tactful in your communication and you're proactive in terms of what's going to happen, what's on the schedule, do a shared calender on Google, so you see what events she's got coming up, what you got coming up, and then something where she needs to know where you've got a podcast interview coming up, so let's not plan an event where she's like, “I thought you're going to go out for a walk or dinner?” I think, literally, I've been cognizant of that lately, just trying to communicate and as much as I think I am, there's always room for improvement.

Nicole:
Yes, so true. Like I said, there's been periods where Gavin and I, my husband, he would say, “Oh, I forget to tell you, I have this thing,” and I'd be like, “Whaat!” Sometimes it was because we were both working and so we would conflict and who's going to watch the kids kind of thing, but like you said, it's almost that, having to be that daily, you said a word there I can't remember it now, but it's like a daily…You really have to be on regiment about it.

Harry:
Proactive.

Nicole:
And checking calenders and saying, “Okay, this is what we're doing. We're clear here.” If I have a mutual partner that we're working with, I'll say, “Oh yeah, it's just told him tonight. They're coming Saturday for lunch at noon.” This is, “Ohh okay.” He would even say, “I thought we had something going on.” That's the problem with being entrepreneur and busy that you do always think there is something going on, which usually there is. *Laughter*.

Harry:
Or you can always find something to fill the time.

Nicole:
You can always find something to fill the time. Yeah. I'm pretty deliberate as far as, not communication, in just having a certain allocated times of just unplugging. No electronics. I mean, I'm one of those. I just got on Facebook, as of like, last year, so I can totally get lost and be like, “Oh my gosh! It's 12 in the afternoon.” You know? I'm definitely one of those I know my personality where I just can't..

Harry:
I have a plugin where I'm going to send you, it's called Facebook Nanny.

Nicole:
Nice.

Harry:
It connects within Chrome and it only lets you go to Facebook if there's an alert and then the other thing you can go there for is to compose a message or do another thing. Then, even when you check on the alert that you had, it only lets you do it for a minute. The funnest thing about it, I guess you put in your information at the beginning and then, if you go at a non-allotted time or some time you're not suppose to, a box pops up, “Nicole, don't you have something better to do?” *Laughter*.

Nicole:
*Laughter*. See, I love that! Jim Woods was talking to me about that, Eric Fisher's friend, and I was like, “Wow,” and he was like, “Oh yeah, I use timers and all this stuff.” And I thought, “Oh man, I don't wanna.” But you know, it's funny. If you know what your weakness is, you definitely would need to use something like that to..Like you said, once you get on it and you start, you get lost.

Harry:
It's a rabbit hole.

Nicole:
It is! It's like you're reading and you're like, “Oh, it's posted here.” What else do they talk about in the podcast groups, wow. Most of the times now I'm kind of over it. Okay, I'm out. They're asking the same questions they were asking like 5 months ago. I'm out.

Harry:
Yeah, what happens with some of the bigger ones is that the newer folks come in and the folks that have been there for a while. It's almost like a cycle. It's the artwork phase, everyone is asking about the artwork. It's the new and noteworthy phase.

Nicole:
Yeah.

Harry:
It's a review my podcast phase. *Laughter*.

Nicole:
I noticed kind of those stopped dying down. I think she, Elise, did a podcast about that kind of, maybe bashing it, I didn't listen to it. I noticed a lot of people aren't asking, “Hey, you wanna trade reviews?” anymore. I actually, since we are talking about podcasting on Podcast Junkies, it's like, I actually listen to them. I'm not just going and giving..I might not listen to the whole thing, but I will listen to enough time to be able to get the jist of , you know, what the podcast is about. I am actually pretty critical, which is horrible, to other podcasters.

Harry:
Oh yeah?

Nicole:
I have one of those short attention spans and if it's not novel to me or like, I dig your music and I was listening to yours and was like, “Of course, he's a DJ. I mean, he knows good music when he hears it.” And so, I look, even though my artwork is horrible, which is funny. So, I'll never admit that to anybody else, but I am real strict. If I were 10 minutes into an it's just going on and on, I'm like, wow, I'm out. I'm out! *Laughter*.

Harry:
I do the same thing. I use those reviews as way to practice writing as well.

Nicole:
Yes, yes.

Harry:
I literally try to write more than 3-4 lines, because you can see the ones in iTunes where it's just like. “Love the show.”, “Awesome host.”

Nicole:
“Great show.”

Harry:
“5 Stars!”

Nicole:
“5 Stars!” *Laughter*. Yes.

Harry:
I was thinking of subtitling this show, Podcast Confessions.

Nicole:
Yeah, that'll be good. Podcast Confessions. Scandalous Confessions. Juicy. I love using those words, because people are like, “WHAT?”

Harry:
Yeah, with your dramatic pause….In this episode of Podcast Junkies..

Nicole:
You will hear how Nic…Confesses to Harry. *Laughter*. But you're right. I would also like to give honor to the host. I actually do some review on the person as well and say, “Oh, what are they're into? Oh, okay, they're into this, they're into health.” I like to welcome them. I want people to feel that, but some of them in the new podcast groups I don't have time and I like to add-on my input, but I just don't.. I actually do wonder how Jared Easley and some of these guys are constantly and engaged. I'm like, holy cow. They're like, amazing. Do they only sleep like three hours a night? *Laughter*.

Harry:
I think their task for the day is to reach out to 20 different podcasters.

Nicole:
It's pretty awesome. Kudos to them. They're asking these cool questions and you see the 48 comments and I'm thinking, “I don't want to comment, because I don't want to get notifications on this whole trend.”

Harry:
Yeah, that's right. You make one comment and you're sucked into the trend.

Nicole:
You've made a commitment. I'm just like, no, I don't want to make that commitment. Sometimes I will..

Harry:
Yeah, the Facebook update that says, “Someone's comment on a trend that you've commented on previously.” I'm like, “Ugh.”

Nicole:
Somebody likes your comment…

Harry:
You can unsubscribe, so you gotta remember to do that.

Nicole:
I do. I do need to remember to do that, yeah, yeah. It's good. Sometimes it does help me connect or find other people. I'm interested, like you'd interviewed Srini, I love just to hear the curious people that he's interviewing or that you're interviewing. That I do like to see different people. I guess for me and the reason why I say I'm critical about other podcasts is a lot of it is the same. I'm just kind of like, “Okay, guys, novel and fresh.” That's what keeps things alive.

I always tell people, if you don't find your inner story or you're inner identity or you don't know who you are..the whole motto with Rap with Nic is, you know, what you do comes out of who you really are. So, it really isn't about the external and what you're doing, it's about who you are and that's just like an overflow so people get this fresh, unique, thing about you that's so cool.

Like, even meeting you at Podcast Movement, I'm like, “Harry's cool. He's got some depth to him, he's got music.” You connect with those things that I like and so you like to and we're connecting with old rap and great 80s and 90s music. So, you know, that's what keeps it alive.

I always tell people some of the people that I coach. You know, do you want to be around in a year? I mean, do you want to be or do you just want the famous names. It's funny, when you ask out in the real world about Jaime Tardy or Michael Stelzner, no one knows who they are. *Laughter*.

Harry:
That's true.

Nicole:
It's podcast underworld that's what's really happening here.

Harry:
Or what is known as a micro celebrity.

Nicole:
Yes, exactly. So, that's cool. You know, it's a cool thing, but it's like, keep things fresh, keep them different, keep it novel.

Harry:
We have all these interests outside of podcasting right, so there's no reason why you can't take the topic that you're discussing..I mean, yours is wide open with Real Men, Real Talking, obviously you cant start with some of the podcasters, but they're so many really, really interesting guys you can talk to and have some fascinating conversations. I think, if you go out of your way to look for someone off the beaten path and every once in a while mix in the more popular names..I think, like you said, in the same way that a person doing that with other likes rounds themselves out, I think a podcast itself has its own personality and by doing that, you round yourself out as a podcaster as well.

Nicole:
I like that and I like the wording of it. Rounding yourself out, because that really what it is about what I think a lot of us try and do with life in general. You know, just kind of make the edges smoother and round it and make it full. Make that fullness satisfying for you. My whole motto is that if I'm not having fun doing it, I literally have recorded stuff and not aired it. I mean, I have stuff in the can from people who are probably wondering, “Hey, when is she gonna post it?”

I know me, I'm real into intuition and just following my gut. I've done a lot of study on the gut, it's amazing. Again, you're doing this 10-day detox. It is amazing how creative you're going to be after these 10 days, because, the gut, 90% our disease starts there and it's like, you feel things when you're emotional, you feel it in your gut. I've suffered a lot of loss, I've had trauma and all of that, so if I..Sometimes, I'll record something and I'll go, “No, I'm not airing this,” or, “I'm not airing this this week.” I don't know if this happens with you, Harry, but I'll do an interview with someone and I'll think, “Oh my god, that was so good.” then I'll listen to it and I'll be like, “This interview blows..” *Laughter*.
Harry:
*Laughter*.

Nicole:
Then, I'll shove it right, for like a couple of weeks or a month and I'll listen to it again and I'll be like, “Oh my god, this is a really good interviewing.” I'm not sure what that is.

Harry:
It's hard to tell in the moment. Like, there's interviews, obviously, when you're doing them it's like, “This is going great.” And then right after, “Yeah, it's not too bad.” Like you said, I guess, maybe they have a shelf life and you can't over think it and you just have to get it out there and let other people weigh in..

Nicole:
Kind of see.. Right, right.

Harry:
The other thing, I was listening to your shows and I think one of the comments that you made that, I'm not sure if it was you or a guest, but you were talking about being specifically made to do something on this earth.

Nicole:
Yeah.

Harry:
I wonder if you could dig into that.

Nicole:
Elaborate?

Harry:
Yeah, elaborate on that, because I hear things like that sometimes and they resonate a lot because they tend to strike a cord.

Nicole:
Well, I do teach a lot about uniqueness, especially working with college students. They're all going there and they're all on mom and dad's penny, usually. I teach at a private college, Florida Southern is rated one of the best, beautiful. Frank lloyd Wright did all of the architectural design. It's an amazing campus. You know, I teach them that.

I did a lot of studies of psychology and sociology. The uniqueness of a person is actually really amazing. So, twins, fraternal and identical twins do not have the same thumb print. So, I truly believe that you are created, again it goes back to that finding out who you are and really following your heart; which is really hard to teach, specifically to men, because we are, as women, who have children; I have little babies, you're very intuitive. You know why that baby's crying. You know, what your son needs. You know, he's over there upset about something. I mean, my husband would laugh and be like, “Oh, I didn't know.”

Harry:
You mentioned something to Jordan Harbinger when you were talking to him, “Yeah, she's hungry. I can tell buy the cry.”

Nicole:
Right! Right. So, I just know and my husband will be like, “How did you know that?” So, we were laughing me and Jordan about the 2% of women being a tiny bit more intuitive than the men, because of that, because of the biological aspect of it, but I also really believe that every person, man and woman, have has specific, almost like cause or mission for their life or design that they're..

Harry:
Calling.

Nicole:
Yeah! Meant to do. I believe truly 110% that if you don't do it, it will not get done. I mean, maybe somebody else will mimic or try to do something that way, but I just believe there's something in us that we were called to create and produce.

Being a musician, it's like, my husband and I know a lot about the sound, the mixing, the producing to make a song or album come alive. I just feel like, I just why I always go back to the fun aspect of it. I'm like, man, if I'm not feeling alive when I'm doing something or having fun doing it, there's joy there, then I don't want to be doing it. Like, I'd rather die than live a boring life. *Laughter*.

I feel like, I talk a lot about desire and awakening and arousing those inner wants and desires. Now, a lot of people talk about it in business. Appeal to their needs and desires and that's actually really true, but most people what me and my husband laughing about, most people truly don't know what it is that they want. They haven't taken the time to set aside and be with themselves long enough to find out what is it that I really want. A lot of people will say freedom, lifestyle, money, but there's deeper than that.

There's some deeper, you really want to know that you have this irreplaceable role and you've got this role on a larger story that means something that makes a dent in the world. That's why I loved I working with mentally ill people and I have a lot of friends, you know, I mean one out of five or four are classified mentally ill. Deep down we're all a little crazy if we really tapped into it and it's a good crazy. It's not like this, you know, scary, lock em up with a straight jacket, but it's a good crazy where you could tap into something that hasn't even been seen before and that's why it's crazy.

I mean, look at Steve Jobs. He was doing something, creating a whole cause and a movement, because he knew it had never been produced before. I just feel like, for us to die, and I interviewed Todd Henry about that, and have all that inside of us and not come out, I think it's probably the worse thing that could ever happen. You know, just to say, well you know, I had all these stuff that I could have done, but I only did 5% of it, because I was worried about making money, I was worried about this or that.

Harry:
I think, I love conversations like this, they give me chills.

Nicole:
Me too. I love it too. It makes me feel alive. *Laughter*.

Harry:
So, it's interesting, you've talked about your role on a larger story, that speaks to someone else you're a fan of Joseph Campbell. You see that arch. Obviously, George Lucas was inspired. You see these story play out in movies and books and things like that. If you really think about it and you put yourself in those shoes..I listen to Joe Rogan a lot and he said, “You should live your life like you're the hero in a movie.” It's the same concept, but if you were watching a movie and this boring, this guy isn't doing anything, what's the excitement? When's this guy going to do something and find the adventure, you know?

Nicole:
Exactly.

Harry:
But, you pretend like someone's watching you in a movie, and you're like, “Oh man. I've got to be exciting or else no one's going to watch me.”

Nicole:
*Laughter*. Right! Right. I always relate it, of course, because of Joseph Campbell to that small story on how we live small. I lot of people now are really into personal development, so they're like, “Yes. Take the risk! Don't be afraid.” I laugh, because it's all on Facebook. I'm guilty. I'll post a few motivational, inspirational stuff, but what I'm learning is a mixture of it. It's the beauty and the adventure with affliction and endurance, you know, of painful things as well.

Joseph Campbell was not, by any means, he talked about slaying your dragons and facing them and following your bliss. He knew, he really intertwined, but I think a lot of people just take the bliss part, but they forget the dragon or they kind of over-glorify the dragon part and say, “You should overcome,” but they don't really show you what that looks like. *Laughter*. I do a lot of teaching on and work on benevolence. I do a lot of benevolent work with psychology, so I teach people to be really be okay with mixture.

Like, I laugh because we're so bi-polar as society. We either want it black or we want it white, but we don't want any gray. We don't want any nitty gritty messy stuff, but really to have a full adventurous life, there is mixed. There is good and bad and ugly and it's all together. It's all together. We can separate it out and say we can only think about the positive, but really, you have to have both. It is an adventure and that is actually the adventure.

Stepping out of the ordinary into this crazy journey where you are taking risks and you know, you're meeting some pain when you do that. You get disappointed, you get let-down, and yet you keep going, because you know there's this bigger story. There's a bigger role. There's a bigger picture to the whole thing.

When I'm consoling people who are desperate, you know, maybe suicidal, it's really mainly what I worked with, I worked in a psyche for 6 years; and it's like, man, you gotta give them some hope. If they don't see that bigger picture, if you can't paint a bigger picture for someone, and you gotta start with yourself, you're going to be able to do that for anyone else. So, it's kind of crazy. I think it's like vital. I think it's like air too us. *Laughter*. That's how passionate about it.

Harry:
I can tell and I'm so happy we got to finally speak, because we're speaking the same language. I just love your enthusiasm. I'm just really excited when I meet people that I can consider souls. I think you and I are like that, but it's funny, you don't have to meet people for a long period of time, it's not like we've known each other for years, but when we meet in person, for me, it's a vibration thing, like the energy exchange thing.

Nicole:
Yes, I agree.

Harry:
And, you either vibe with the person or you don't or you're like something is off with that person and you have one conversation and that's it, but other people you're just want to be around them, because they're eliminating this energy, this zest for life, which is awesome.

Nicole:
Yes. That's exactly how I felt when I met you at Podcast Movement. I was like, we were all sitting in our mastermind group and I was like, man! Of course, this is part of my persona, if no bodies, you know, leading conversation, I will definitely start doing it. *Laughter*. So, it was cool. There was some little stuff that was happening, but I definitely felt connected with you. I was like, “Oh! Harry! Podcast Junkies!” I was excited.

Harry:
*Laughter*.

Nicole:
It is an energy. It's definitely is a, I like what you said, it's like soul-minded there, because a lot of it is our soul. It's like that deep yearning, again, that desire for more and you know there's more. That's the thing with people their call, they know, there's a knowing. I talk about the knowing a lot. It's actually deeper an intuition, because an intuition is kind of like inkling. It's like a little nudge, a little gut feeling here and there, but a knowing is like a conviction.

You couldn't tell me that's something that I know that I'm called to do that anybody could convince me other. It'll be like telling Steve Jobs you're not going to sell and do this and make a whole revolution, change the world. So, there's a knowing. A deep knowing. I really think the only way to get to that is to really keep going on the journey and finding yourself and not, I teach people this a lot, don't harden those areas in your life where you've had disappointment, where you've had failures.

That's what we tend to do, we tend to self-protect and harden and then our demons get bigger, because we're not really dealing with them. I did a podcast recently about confrontation. It sucks so bad to do it, you know, you have to do it in your business, you have to do it with VA's that are ticking you off or people or your wife. Me and Gavin, I tell you, every time we took a huge risk like moving to a third world country or starting a business or starting our own non-profit, there was huge confrontations. *Laughter*.

Harry:
As well as it should be, right?

Nicole:
Huge heated debates and it was always centered around that. So, but I loved it because, I mean, I hated it at the time, it sucked, but I loved it afterwards, because I would see such growth and such life come from that and such. You know, I call it, I call it fruit, because you're baring, your producing something. Other people can eat that fruit and say, “Wow, this is really good.” You can make wine with it and people can drink it and say, “This is good stuff, man.” *Laughter*.

Harry:
*Laughter*.

Nicole:
That's what we're really called to do. Your wine tastes so unique and specific like no other. That's how..If people could think of it like that. If you can really get to your fruit and really make your wine so that others partake in it. That's what a wealth mindset is. That's what people are with unlimited resources, they're not limited by fear and money, and all that other crap. They're saying, “You know what? I'm here to connect with other powerful and influential people.” That's what the podcast is about. Powerful and influential men moving the world and changing lives.

Harry:
Did you hear the Tony Robbins on Tim Ferriss?

Nicole:
No. I haven't. I have been a little bit out of the loop lately. Is it recent?

Harry:
Yeah, I think it's his latest one.

Nicole:
Totally gonna listen to that.

Harry:
He's been hitting it out of the park lately. He had Ramit Sethi on there, which is really good.

Nicole:
He's my favorite. I'm a huge Ramit fan.

Harry:
But that Tony Robbin's episode. It was a two part-er. It's about money and our relationship with it and he gets to speak to some really powerful people in finance. These are people who are so rich that they're not in famous, because they don't like to be in the news, but they're billionaires and trillionaires.

Nicole:
Yeah.

Harry:
Of course, Tony Robbin's has access to them and he pulls out these crazy nuggets of information. You're so motivated in typical Tony Robbin's fashion. *Laughter*. By the time you're done, you're like, “Where's the book? I gotta order the book. I gotta go on Amazon right now and pre-order it.” and stuff like that, so..

Nicole:
Yeah. It's like a magic..but again, what he has and I've studied Tony and how he came about and how Jay Abraham who really pushed him to charge a higher premium client in coaching. I'm real into that because that's what I do, I do coaching and consoling. To see the energy behind and all of that unfolding with Tony's, like I know, like me and him are real good friends. You know, like me and tony came together the other day.

Harry:
*Laughter*.

Nicole:
But to see his life, I do study people, so to watch how it all unfolded and how he jumped and does boxing moves before he goes out to speak to get the energy moving for him. He's like a machine gun when he comes out, but he said it's all been unfolding for me to know what those nuggets are and just learning. Asking those questions, like what me and you are doing on podcasts, getting those nuggets from other people and taking that and saying, “Okay, what can I learn from this?” “What do I need to add to this in my life?” You know, he's amazing. Yeah.

Harry:
It's that constant curiosity of how do I what I do better. This folks operate on another level.

Nicole:
Totally different level.

Harry:
Their mindset. When you hear their mind and you get an opportunity to kind of listen in with the fly on the wall stuff with these conversations. It's like, oh man, their thinking process is like so advanced, but sometimes by virtue of listening to them, I got charged up and like, I got charged up. I was like motivated. I dunno if it was the coffee or some brain supplement I'd taken that day. I was wired listening to that podcast and I was like, “Man, these guys are firing me up.”

Nicole:
*Laughter*. Yeah. It makes you high. It kicks in that dopamine and it gives you a piece of that knowing. That's what I believe. That's what he says. He has conviction. There's nothing you can say or do, like we do rap offs and you got Eminem and someone else in the ring or dance offs, if you could a motivational speaking off, you know, there's nothing you could say that would back down what he's pulling out of himself into others. It's just amazing. The story telling. He has everything that I basically want to master, so story telling, frame control, learning all those body language, and how to read people. I've seen him in an audience and just pull someone out and just speak into their life and they're balling. I'm thinking, damn. That's magic, dude.

Harry:
*Laughter*.

Nicole:
*Laughter*. That's where it's at right there. He's doing it with such a heart of wanting to see this person get to that level. That's what's so amazing. It is that energy we're feeling when we're listening to that. It's like, “Oh my gosh.” I could do this too. That's what's so cool about. It is in us. It's always been in us and if we can just tap into it and cut out..That's what I do in coaching, I just out the crap, man. Let's just cut it down.

In fact, with my speech, before me and you got on tonight, I was cutting it out, cutting out stuff, taking out lines, killing my baby, like James Altucher says, “Write and cut it out.” It's like a microscope. More specific, more specific, on what my message is, on what who I am, my identity, my ideas. Ideas are the currency right now of America. It's not about money anymore, it's about your idea and how much you can get it to travel. For people to hold on to it and really run with it, that's business 101 right now. You know, podcasting, everything.

Harry:
What you're doing is putting a premium on your words.

Nicole:
Yes.

Harry:
Like, there's a value to everything that's going to go on that paper and that's eventually going to come out when you're on stage. You have a set time to deliver a message and what you choose to do in that period of time, how powerful that message is, speaks to the preparation you've done before hand.

Nicole:
Well, that's what I love about your podcast coming up Productivity Sauce. 15 minutes, like my talk tomorrow night is 15 minutes. They put a big clock, so it's kind of cool, it's like a mini prep for TED talks. You can pick any topic you want and you do it on wealth mindset. It's that 15 minutes, because most of us really don't think about it, but we would go on and on and on. I mean, I've been blabbing with you for the last I dunno where my timer is, 30 minutes, an hour almost. It's crazy. That podcast you're coming out with, Productivity, it's going to be tight, man. People want that. They don't have time. The statistics show, 18 minutes, there's actual science why a TED talk is 18 minutes long.

Harry:
Well, you're aiming for big things and I think you're going to hit your goals and you're just going to do TEDx, you want actual TED talk.

Nicole:
That's right, baby! That's right!

Harry:
I think the way you attack things, the way you take on challenges, it's just obvious..it's not a matter of if it's going to happen, it's just a matter of when. I'm looking forward to when that happens.

Nicole:
Thanks Harry, I can't wait. You know what, the key is to it, and I'll anyone listening to your podcast tonight is really not giving to bleepity bleep's shit. I mean, it really isn't. When I stopped caring about what others think or what others are going to say or why I'm not making this much I just like, I don't care anymore. I really don't. I lost too many people in my life to like, I don't have time to worry about what you're thinking about. Except for tonight, because I was worried you were going to put this on video, because I have no makeup on. *Laughter*. Even then, I would get over it.

Harry:
Yes, there's worse things that have happened. *Laughter*. You've been in Honduras, so..

Nicole:
I know and I didn't wear make up then. You just sweat it off, so..*Laughter*.

Harry:
*Laughter*. What do you got coming up in terms of guests on the show?

Nicole:
I am aiming to get ‘The Rock' on the show, Dwayne. *Laughter*. I totally have been. I haven't been stalking him, no. I don't want to be needy, but I've just been putting it out there. I'm going to get Jesse Elder and I have talked. You know who he is?

Harry:
No.

Nicole:
He does ethical cult building. He's really cool. He's in the personal niche development and he's neat guy. So, he's doing lots of things like movement and shaking with your identity and success and stuff.

Harry:
That's cool.

Nicole:
We've chatted and we're going to get him on, but yet my stretch is on there. I mean, I'm still really holding out for James Altucher and I have reached out to Ryan Holiday. Johnny Andrews and I are laughing about this. He had reached out to him too. Ryan Holiday is a good friend of Tucker, so I'm friends with him on Facebook. I actually, put some value out there man. I said, “I'll write you some 10 ideas for your next book or something or I'll do some intern work if you need.” *Laughter*.

I'm a huge Ryan Holiday fan. I haven't had the balls to ask for Ramit..Well, I take that back, I was one of Ramit's students, so I did ask him when, I didn't even launch yet, and I asked him and of course, you know, there was the big rejection there, but I love Ramit. He is one my, him and Tim Ferriss, and I, Tim Ferriss, I haven't even, yeah, I haven't even attempted to ask him. So, those guys I have to ask, James, Ramit, Ryan Holiday. I was thinking Ryan Holiday will show me some love, I just got to get creative on how to ask. It's all in the asking.

Harry:
It's all in the intention.

Nicole:
*Laughter*.

Harry:
So, that's like, you put it out there already, so I think you're half way there now and you're putting those vibrations out, so you're on the road to having that happen.

Nicole:
The cool thing about Dwayne, ‘The Rock', Hercules shall we call him, he actually tweeted me, because I mad a public tweet out to him and I was like, “Hey. You know, I only interview real men, are you in?” I was kind of like giving an almost, almost, borderline cocky, overly.

Harry:
Why not?

Nicole:
But I think, what the heck do I have to lose? It's The Rock, so..and then, we live in Florida, the Gator boys. Have you ever heard of that show, The Gator Boys?

Harry:
No.

Nicole:
They actually wrestle alligators. It's on TV. I can't remember what show it's on, but it's on Netflix. It's called The Gator Boys, so I've reached out to them as well recently, so hopefully I'll hear back from them.

What about you??

Harry:
I've got some interesting guests. I'm working towards having Jordan on as well.

Nicole:
Yes, yes.

Harry:
And the guys that do the Performance Enhancing podcast. Really fascinating guys. So it's interesting. I had a really good episode that's going to be released in a day or two with John Corcoran. He's worked for the white house and just kind of the network effect, because it's opening up doors to other podcasters.

Nicole:
It is really fun to do that. The networking effect to see that happening.

Harry:
Have you heard of the Experiential You podcast?

Nicole:
I have heard of it, yes.

Harry:
That's with Nida Kazmi. She actually speaks to an audience similar to the audience you speak to.

Nicole:
Yeah, I'm friends with her on Facebook. She's really good.

Harry:
Yeah.

Nicole:
I should interview her, but she's a girl. I am going to do Real Time, Real Woman only though.

Harry:
It'll be interesting because you're both tackling sort of the subjects and kind of riff on that.

Nicole:
Maybe me and her could co-host something with a couple of guests. That would be fun. You could be our hot seat.

Harry:
I'll make sure I prep for that. *Laughter*.

Nicole:
Your productivity stuff is going to be mad though, because you've got like some mad skills.

Harry:
Thank you, I appreciate that.

Nicole:
It's going to be cool and you have to be on Real Time. I already asked you, you just have to coordinate it.

Harry:
It has to happen. I can't wait..

Nicole:
Is there anybody that can see you right now? You're turning red, it's funny. *Laughter*. He's such a humble guy, guys.

Harry:
If they couldn't see now, now they know. Thanks.

Nicole:
*Laughter*.

Harry:
Let's bring this home.

Nicole:
Okay.

Harry:
Where do you want people to stalk you on the internet?

Nicole:
Definitely RapWithNic.com. They can stalk me there on Twitter, Facebook, wherever, website, and that links to the podcast, so.. I don't know why I kept Rap With Nic as the main, but I just have an idea of doing different podcasts with Real Time. Like, Real Health only, because I'm really big into fitness and emotional..and really, I actually I'm suppose to do a relationship show. It's going to be live. We're going to have call-ins.

Harry:
Nice. Like the Dr. Drew.

Nicole:
Yeah. Yeah. Dr. Drew in a female form. *Laughter*.

Harry:
On that note, thank you so much for making time.

Nicole:
Thank you so much, Harry. It's so good to see you.

Harry:
Thanks for listening. Hope you enjoyed that episode. All our current episodes and back episodes are available at PodcastJunkies.com so you can check out individual show notes and pages. We're starting to put transcripts on there as well, if you want to dig into the details of the conversation. As always, this show always lives and dies by it's review. So, head on over to PodcastJunkies.com/itunes or /stitcher to leave us a review for a particular episode or for the overall show if you're digging it. Those are greatly appreciated. We love to get that feedback any time we can. If you've got an idea for a guest or an upcoming show or you think we should be speaking to someone, also send us that feedback on our contact page and PodcastJunkies.com. Thanks for listening. I truly, truly appreciate it. I hope you guys have a fantastic week.

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