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Harry Duran:
Welcome back to Podcast Junkies. Also known as the podcaster's voice. Now, the reason why I gave it that tag line is because I'm searching out some interesting folks in podcasting and I wanna let you listen to them in a more relaxed environment, not a formal Q&A. I want to kick back their heels. I want them to chill out a bit. I just want them to speak what's on their mind and we can talk podcasting or in the case of this week's interview, we can talk vinyl records and pizza and shoveling sunshine.

I'll explain, actually, Lou will explain more later, but this week it's episode 46, it's Lou Mongello and he's the host of WDW Radio, which if you don't know, is the premier podcast for all things Walt Disney World related and if you can think of it as a topic for Walt Disney, then more likely than not Lou has covered it on the show. Everything from cruises to restaurants to rides to attractions to hotels to characters to movies to actors. It's just a whole whirlwind of Walt Disney World and if you can't get your fix of Walt Disney World, I don't know where you're going to get it.

So, he's really a fantastic, really energetic guy. What you see is what you get with Lou and you'll hear him say that later and I really found that to be the case when I met him in person at New Media Expo. I was not disappointed. He's really fun and gregarious and he had just come off winning the podcast awards, best travel podcast now. It's going on ten, I think ten years running.

So, it's just a testament to the amount of effort and dedication that he puts into the show and it's just fantastic to watch. It's fantastic to listen to and it's always great to speak to people who have that sort of passion, because it just makes the conversation that much more fun, that much more interesting and it gives you, the listener, a feel for who this person is and in the case of, Lou, really it's the same person. You know, the same people you'll meet in person – live is the person that you hear on the podcast week in and week out.

So, we talk a bunch of stuff about the actual show, the inspiration for it, and really what drove him to start it and really more importantly, what keeps him going and why he's so passionate about what he does. Some of the cool things that have happened as a result of the show and a couple of thoughts on where we're headed from a podcasting perspective.

So, I hope you enjoy the show. I had a fantastic conversation. I was not disappointed, so stay tuned to the end of the interview for my retention hashtag. I just came up with that. It's something – that might be the new name for it, but it's a way to see if you've been listening to the end and it's a little something to show your support for me and for the guest. So, stay tuned, enjoy the show, and I'll catch you at the end.

So, Lou Mongello, thank you so much for joining us on Podcast Junkies.

Lou Mongello:
Hey man, thanks so much for having me, Harry.

Harry:
You see guys, this wasn't like multiple takes. We do it natural, so it is real as we possibly can. So, it was nice to run into finally at New Media Expo and congratulations again on your award.

Lou:
Yeah, thank you very much, man. It was cool to meet you face-to-face. I had heard your name and heard about the show for a while, so it was nice to literally almost sort of bump into you at the back of the conference floor.

Harry:
So, it must be funny to say, but does it get old? Because you've won the best travel podcast now since 2006, right?

Lou:
Yeah and I hate to say that like I won, you know, the show won, but really is and I mean this sincerely, man, like, the people, the friends that listen, because I consider them friends not fans. The people that listen, they're the ones that win that award. They go out, they nominate the show, they go vote everyday. So, it's great for me to see them get recognized that way.

Harry:
So, what you're saying without the support of the fans, there's no way that you could have that sort of on-going wins every year for the podcast?

Lou:
Absolutely. It's – again, I don't like the word fans, I mean, but it really is all about, you know, having a really good engaged community.

Harry:
So, when you first started it and you had the idea for a podcast. Did you had an idea that the community would get this big or you were just focused on getting a show on a regular basis?

Lou:
Dude, it was 2005. I didn't even know that there was a community out there to potentially listen because it was pre-social media. So, you know, I was doing a podcasting at a time where it was brand new when I didn't know if anybody was going to find it and go through all the machinations to actually listen. So, I would love to tell you that I had the grand vision of what this podcast was going to become, but that would be a blatant lie.

Harry:
It had to be overwhelming because folks that I've spoken to, you know, I've spoken to Ray Ortega and Elsie Escobar and Daniel J. Lewis and Dave Jackson and they talk about, really, like when you say the technology wasn't there in 2005, it's almost like an understatement, right, because your cobbling to get a lot of pieces with the hopes that you'll have something that sounds good and you'll be able to broadcast it and so, what made you think it was something you could start or who was your inspiration at that time?

Lou:
So, it wasn't about a who being an inspiration. I've always been sort of a tech geek. I didn't date very much in highschool, so when I heard about the technology, I just knew about the power of the spoken word over anything that I could write, so a friend and I who was also a geek and a Disney guy as well, we're like, we need to give this a shot. We need to figure this out and it was, man, it was like figuring out how to hand code an RSS and then post it and then explain to people how to download like a JUCE player and type the feed in and it was very, very confusing, but very early on we were able to get an audience and I was like, wait a minute, I think we've got something here. I think there are people out there that are starved for this kind of content.

Harry:
And what was the best way for you to measure listenership back in those days?

Lou:
I didn't and I still don't. I'm not a numbers guy. I don't care about numbers. I do the same show for one person that I would do for 5,000, 50,000 or 5 million. So, when we first started the show, we were like, wow. 250 people! Like, that was the only thing we needed. Okay, somebody is listening and for me, that's all I need. Like, if that one guy is listening, I'm going to keep on going, so unless I'm talking to a sponsor, I never check my numbers. I don't really care.

Harry:
So, when was the moment you realized that you were having an impact on folks? A lot of times for first time podcasters, it's their first conference and they run into a fan and they're like, oh, I'm happy to hear your show or thanks for the show or something like that, so what was your moment like that when you first started your podcast?

Lou:
When I started to get emails from people and it wasn't just, hey man, I think the show is cool. I get my Disney fix. But you don't realize, man, the sometimes profound impact that you have on somebody's life and it's mind boggling and I'm sure you know too. You get emails like, hey man, this show impacted me and it made me do this. You have done something that potentially changed somebody's life for the better, it happened early on and it was a response that I never could have imagined. I'm like, I'm talking about Disney World and rides and Mickey Mouse and food and things like that, but if you can bring a little bit of happiness into somebody's life, that's the best reward.

Harry:
So, the origins of the podcast are from, from what I heard, listen to you speak about it on a couple of shows and you are really, really affected in a positive way from your first Disney World experience, right?

Lou:
Yeah, I went when I was three years old in 1971. I went back with my parents every year and the thing I found in love with wasn't necessarily the attractions. Look at me, I obviously like the food as well, but it was the memories that I created with my family.

Harry:
But it's funny, because a lot of kids when they go to those sort of parks, you know, they're really impacted, because everything seems so much bigger when you're younger, right. When you're tiny and you go to Universal Studios, you go to Disneyland, you go, even Six Flags, you're just like amazed and then it's funny, because sometimes you go back as an adult and you're like, wow, I was kind of amazed at this stuff when I was little, but now that I come back, it's sort of like, you know, the shine has worn off a bit, but it seems like something about Disney World always held something magically for you year over year.

Lou:
Yeah. I actually had the opposite reaction. As I went back and as we were continuing to go back and I was loving and I saw these other people kept going back. I'm like, what is it, what keeps bringing us back and all these other people back, so I learned everything I could about the pack and the infrastructure and the engineering and the operation and the cast members and the more I learned, the more fascinating it became to me and that was sort of lead to me eventually writing a book that I wanted to read about Disney, sort of the thing that I was interesting in with the details and the trivia and that really sort of the snowball rolling downhill.

Harry:
What year was that? The very first book that you wrote about Disney?

Lou:
I started writing in 2003.

Harry:
Okay, because before that, you had actually written a book about DJing, a DJing book.

Lou:
Oh man! You've done your homework. Oh my God! Yeah, I've always sort of had this entrepreneurial spirit, so I was a lawyer and I had an IT consulting company and even before that, I had started a DJ business when I was in highschool and college and I, again, was frustrated because there was no book to teach you how to do it. If you didn't know a DJ, you couldn't learn other than by trial and error or somebody taught you.

So, it was like, I'm going to write the book. Again, I wrote the book I wanted to read, which was a DJ handbook and at the beginning I was literally printing it. I did it on Word Perfect for DOS 5.0. I printed it out at home. I was using a spiral binder in my basement and putting ads in magazines and, you know, it was a little entrepreneur in little Lou Mongello.

Harry:
Well, that, your listeners will know that I'm going to jump all over this, because my background as a DJ as well, so I've been 20+ years and I grew up with the Technics 1200s and I'll do a little, right there you can see my vinyl collection.

Lou:
Oh! I did it, man. I love it. You still got your turntables!

Harry:
I still got my turntables and that's a famous book casing for DJs. It's IKEA. It's one of those ones you turn sideways and then I put the heavy duty caster wheels, casters on the bottom and I can roll it around and stuff. So, there's probably some more my parents are dying to have me remove from their house. They're like, please, what are we going to do with this vinyl? Can you just get rid of it? I'm like, no! Don't touch it. I'm sure you're the same way with your collectables.

Lou:
Yeah, well, man, look, how many people right now are going, vinyl and caster wheels and carrying around in milk crates. They're like, I bring my iPad and I'm done, because that's how it's done now.

Harry:
So, did you specialize in any kind of music, were you doing weddings or?

Lou:
Oh, this is going to be embarrassing. So, look, I grew up in Jersey, man, and I dug like dance music and house music. So, I loved doing, I love creating remixes and all that kind of stuff, but you know, you do things to pay the bills, so I was doing college parties and occasional weddings and Christmas..I didn't like doing weddings. It was too much pressure, because like if I screwed up, like, I blew the most important day in their life. So, Christmas parties, everybody was liquored up. It wasn't a big deal and college parties, who cares? So, we're just having fun.

Harry:
Well, it's funny because we're probably separated by a couple of years. I was born in 1970, so I think in terms of the time, I probably know the collection of records you have and especially since you're from New Jersey and you mentioned in the past, you would take your horrible vacations at Seaside Heights, I think, we might have even gone to the same clubs, I think.

Lou:
Possibly.

Harry:
Because I grew up in New York. I grew up in Yonkers.

Lou:
Oh! No kidding?

Harry:
Yeah, yeah. I just moved to LA like a year ago, a year and a half ago, but yeah, I was born in El Salvador, but I was raised – at a year old, I came to Yonkers, so my whole life I went to highschool in White Plains. So, yeah, DJing, highschool parties and lugging around milk crates. It was an interesting way to actually be social at that time, because that's about how you get out and about and meet people.

Lou:
Yeah, very true. It's funny how you start from there and now look at us. Now, you're sort of still behind, but now instead of just sort of talking, introducing things and songs and stuff, you're able to share a lot more and have much more creative input too.

Harry:
What's funny is you talked about how you were so fascinated with Walt Disney World and everything around the park and digging deeper everything about how it was created, the imaginers on Walt Disney himself. It's almost this innate natural-born curiosity that a lot of people have, but they just don't decided to go further and further with it and see what they can possibly make out of it and obviously, like you said, you were a lawyer before and a successful club DJ or maybe not.

Maybe not on that one, but what's interesting is that when I first got into this whole internet marketing space that eventually lead to podcasting, I wanted to create a mobile app and it was for electronic music, DJs, and again, just following your mantra of like do something that I'm really passionate about and dig into it. I was like, well, if I'm going to create a mobile app, I might as well do something that I know and that I'll be interested in, so I guess that was like your mindset when you started to dig deeper on your love of Walt Disney World.

Lou:
Yeah, absolutely, man. I'm a huge proponent, I know the word passion is thrown around quite a bit, but I do believe you need to love what you do, like I love what I freaking do everyday and I get excited and I work seven days a week and it never feels like work and I think, you hear from so many people. Oh, I'm going to start a podcast, everybody is going to write a book. There's a huge nexus between the people that say they're going to write a book and the people that actually sit down and start writing and that's where everybody sort of gets lost in, you know, you've got the idea or you've got this dream or whatever and actually going out and executing on it. That's sort of where, you know, that's what separates the men from the boys.

Harry:
Was it specifically like that part, because obviously now Walt Disney World is like a whole enterprise, right, because there's Walt Disney World, there's Disneyland and then there's obviously the parks that go across to the other countries. I'm assuming you've been to Disneyland as well?

Lou:
I have. I love me some Disneyland.

Harry:
I think you were mentioning on one of the shows how you actually preform the Tomorrowland of Disneyland, I think you were saying.

Lou:
Yeah, man. Space Mountain and Ghost Galaxy. There's a lot I dig about your Tomorrowland.

Harry:
So, when you decided to go in and have the podcast. I'm just fascinated about how you just dive in and you just figured, did you have a format laid out did you decided what you were going to talk about or you figured, there's plenty here and I'm just going to turn on the mic every week and I'm going to keep talking until I run out of stuff to talk about?

Lou:
Again, I would love to tell you I had my first 20 shows mapped out. I knew exactly what I was going to do. I had a general format and I used to do a show with a lot of different segments in it and now I sort of do a single segment and trivia and a little bit, but the idea was simply to make the listener feel as though they were sitting around a table, like at a dinner in Jersey with a couple of friends just talking about the things that they loved about Walt Disney World.

So, I wanted to enhance their appreciation of the park and their enjoyment of their next visit. So, whether it was vacation planning or interview and look, I'm a fan first. So, I was interviewing people that I wanted to talk to and that's the thing and there's where – people can tell. If you really love what you're talking about or if it's a job, if you're just sort of going through the motions, so look, you know, as podcasters, I think we're always still figuring out what works.

Harry:
And so, where there times in that when you started where you figured like, you were ready to throw in the towel or you felt like this was something you could keep doing?

Lou:
When I started, it was let's just start and see what happens and then it was, alright, well, this is fun, let's just keep going and see what happens and then at one point you start to realize, hey, I might have something here and Harry, I never set out for this to be anything more than just something I enjoyed doing on the side. Yeah, we started doing, you know, I had started doing like little bit of AdSense and some affiliate things just to help pay the bills and it really all changed when I got a phone call one day for someone who was like, hey, I love what you're doing. This is what my company's name is. What do you charge to sponsor the show? And there was dead silence, because I had no idea how to answer.

Harry:
Yeah, I heard that a couple of times before that you don't even know and then you put out a number and they always say when you're trying to do these things if the respond very quickly to the first number you threw out there then you know the number was too low. So, what was the inflection point then where this actually became really like a full-fledged business?

Lou:
So, after that call, it really was an eye opening experience for me and I'm like, well, wait a minute, you know, I think there's something here and as I was traveling back and forth often, like twice a month from New Jersey to Florida to do research or go to events and I started getting invited to media events, I was making money, but I wasn't making enough that I could quit the job I was doing, but I said look, if I want to do this and I think I can and I don't know what the plan is, I don't know how I'm actually going to do it yet, but if I want to do it, I need to be there. I need to be where what I do is, which is in Orlando, so I had left the practice.

I was a Chief Technology Office for a medical imaging company, so I had a really cushy job playing on the internet all day, like doing my Disney stuff, but I left it and I sold my house and I brought money to my closing and I moved to a house in Florida that I hadn't even seen yet that my parents rented for me online and I didn't have a business plan, I didn't have a game plan, but I knew, Harry, my fear was that five years, ten years, 20 years down the road, I would regret. Like, man, what would have happened if I gave it a shot and I said, look, if it doesn't work, I'll go get a job at Denny’s, like I'll make sure my kids can eat a couple of times a week.

Harry:
Yeah, that Breakfast Grand Slam is actually pretty good.

Lou:
Exactly! Listen, Ramen noodles? Why not?

Harry:
Oh man, that's so important Lou, like I mean, there's so many people that are listening that are going to listen that have been at that point when it's probably the scariest point at which to make the jump, because you see that there's potential for what you're doing. You know that you're going to be passionate about it and you know that when you make the jump, you're going to go head first and you're going to give it all you got and you're not going to look back. Like they say, burn the bridges, right? You know, there's no other option.

There's no plan B. I'm here, I landed and I'm going to have to make it happen, because there's nothing else I can fall back on and, you know, I don't know what else, you know, propelled you besides your passion, but I wonder if there's something other than what you've already articulated that really is really the point that you said, you know what, this is it, I gotta do it.

Lou:
Well, I'll tell you, you said is there something else other than my passion? Harry, I'm going to tell you, man, fear is a great motivator, you know? Fear like, hey man, if I don't get up off my butt and make something happen, like you as an entrepreneur, solopreneur, you're not just steering the ship, sometimes you're the only guy on the ship. So, you gotta do a little bit of everything. You're the sales guy, you're the marketing guy, you're the content guy, you're the producer, you've got to juggle a lot of balls and there's no excuses and there's no day off. You need to go make that happen and I dig that, man. That's what fuels my machine is and even 12-13 years later, whatever it is, like I still get fear all the time and that continues to sort of propel me forward.

Harry:
Yeah, because it's funny, because once it's your own business, like you are the capital of the ship and if you've got folks that are dependent on you not just for the show, but depending on the success of the podcast for their livelihood, it starts to get even more scary, because then, you know, their future is in your hands as well.

Lou:
Absolutely and, you know, having children. Look, if you’re a solo guy, it's easier, you know. If you failed, not a big deal, when you have a wife, when you have kids, when you have a mortgage, when you have all of these real adult responsibilities, you can sort of, you go and see those kids sleeping and you're like, hey man, you know what? You might be tired, but you gotta put a couple of more hours in, because these kids are depending on you for the rent, for the tuition so that they an eat and to, you know, I'm trying to sent an example for my kids. You know, not just that you can do whatever you want, but a certain type of work ethic too.

Harry:
Yeah, because it's almost like a – that's severely lacking and kids you see nowadays and you notice it when someone has that inner fire at a young age and it's probably something you can relate to because it's something you had because that passion, part of it can probably be taught, but it's almost like when you see that fire in someone's that young, you want to nurture it as much as you can.

Lou:
Yeah, it's funny. All these secondary and tertiary businesses have grown out of this Disney thing. You know, I do, you know, I do some coaching and I do some consulting and I do a lot of speaking and I love speaking to schools and to kids, because if you can reach a couple of those kids in middle school or highschool or whatever grade level and all of a sudden their eyes widen and they're like, wait a minute, I don't have to do what my dad did which was go to school, go to college, get a job I hate, and then do what I like on the weekends at nights?

You know, it's incredibly rewarding when you see a kid come up to you afterwards and say, hey, this is what I want to do and then they go and do it, right, because they got the tools and the opportunity to blog or podcast or start a YouTube channel. Nobody has to award it to them and I like those kids and I use kids in air quotes that don't have that sense of entitlement that we see so many people having even in our space, right, even in the podcasting, you know, like oh, hey man, I'm podcasting for three months, like where's my money? Like, that's not how it works, man. Like, you gotta put in the time and the hours like anything else and the sacrifice.

Harry:
Yeah, I think that's, it bares repeating because this is really a long view type of venture-type of business, right, because you know, if you wanted to get in and follow a path of certain folks that we know that have done very, very, very well in the podcasting space and then you think, well, I will just mimic what they did and I'll just have that same luck, it's not going to happen and there's probably dozen of times where you're just going to feel like quitting and I think that's almost a reason for you to double down and just keep at it that much harder.

Lou:
Yeah and I do not subscribed and I know it works for some people and that's cool, but I don't believe in the blueprint or the formula or whatever it is, you know, I don't even have like a marketing strategy, sales funnel drip sequence, but I don't do any of that stuff. Like, you know, this is who I am, all I can bring you is my experience and because I think it's got to be organic, man, you gotta do what just feels right. If you try to follow a formula that's not right for you or not right for your audience, it's not going to work. You got to do what's going to resonate with them and what's going to feel good and right to you and not something so formulaic and blueprinted that it's not really who you are.

Harry:
I think what's more important just even in your description of that, the passion comes through, right, because if you're not passionate about what you do and you're just excited to wake up every morning and just add value and be genuine too, because there's a lot of folks that are just BS and even within jut this space, like people like you've heard on the show and then you meet them in real life and you're just like, what, you don't sound at all like that interview. Why do you have this different voice that's like you're not genuine and the podcast that I listen to, the folks that I resonate with and the folks like have coming on the show are just, I use the #realtalk. It's people that are genuine and that when you hear them and when the audience hears them, you can tell there's passion behind that voice.

Lou:
I think in this medium, what I love about it is it forces the curtain to go away and what I mean by that is, you can't fake it on a podcast. Your audience is going to be able to tell if you love what you're talking about or not. Look, if I did a podcast about cupcakes next week because I thought there was money to be made in the cupcake space, I'd fail miserably, because – well, alright, I like cupcakes, so that's a bad example, but they would tell. I'd fail because cupcakes isn't in my DNA. It's not what I love talking about and they can hear it. You know, man, they can tell when you're passionate, they can tell when you're angry, they can tell when you're crying or emotional. I tell podcasters all the time, smile when you podcast, because people can hear it.

Harry:
Yeah, it's funny. That's actually really good advice, because you know, sometimes I stand when I'm doing interviews as well, because it changes your body structure and like you said, even if it's silly – you're just the only one in the room, there's no reason why you can't just laugh out loud or scream like no one is going to hear – maybe your neighbors, I don't know, but it doesn't matter, because like you said, when people are smiling behind the mic, you can really, really hear it and it comes through. Those are the type of people that you really want to hear more of, right?

Lou:
Yeah and if people say, oh, you know, I recorded my podcast, it takes me six hours to edit out all the ums and all the – I'm like, what are you doing? Like, that's not how we talk. Your audience I think wants to hear you be you because that's who they're listening to. They're not listening to content. They like Harry, they want to hear Harry. They want to hear you mess up, they want to hear you laugh. They want to hear you go off on a rant or a tangent, because they like you.

Harry:
Yeah, they don't want automaton.

Lou:
Yeah.

Harry:
So, I guess in the beginning, I was thinking about the name of the show. You called it WD Radio because at that time it was probably, you weren't even thinking of like, podcasting, like the hot word at the time. You're like, yeah, radio, like everyone knows radio, I'll call it that.

Lou:
Absolutely. Totally deliberate choice, because look, it's 2015. We're still explaining to people what a podcast is, right, so I said look, the word radio immediately conveys that there's some sort of audible content and that's why I chose it.

Harry:
How much time do you spend on those intros? I heard like, I've listened to several and in the beginning I'm like, oh, this is cute, he puts a couple of the changing of the radio station dial and it jumps to different snippets and then I started hearing to a couple more and I'm like, wait a minute, these are different. Are you creating these for like every single episode?

Lou:
Yeah, I'm 412 or whatever it is and everyone of them has been different and I dig it. That's part of the creative process and again, it helps the listener who can't get to Disney, it connects them to the experience, like, oh, I know that sound. Oh, I can hear the train whistle. Oh, that bit of that song or a line from an attraction, so I know that immediately that makes people happy and sort of them gets them into what we're talking about.

Harry:
So, you're still doing your own editing?

Lou:
Yeah, man. I still do my own editing. I still – every now and then I'll get some help on the intros and stuff, but I still do my own editing, I still do my own feed. I actually like still somewhat hand code my feed, because I've been doing this for so many years. I do, I like the process even when I'm up late and exhausted, whether it's picking the right sound or picking the right music or whatever it might be, it's a part of the thing I really still enjoy doing.

Harry:
I wonder if some of that comes from your DJ back ground?

Lou:
It could be right! Yeah, because I have fun and even if you've got someone else to do it, I'm like, it's still wouldn't be the way I would do it. I would have done things a little bit differently here, so I know what I recorded, I know what's going to sound right or be right and I do it. It still allows me to be creative in addition to do all the business side of running the business of what we do.

Harry:
How big the enterprise or the business now? Has it grown to the point where you're adding ore folks to help you out?

Lou:
So, on paper really it's me, right, so I'm the guy. I am the chief cook, and bottle washer, but I'm really fortunate, man, because I have great team of people behind me and the team of people have all come from the community. They've all come from the tribe, so if I say, hey, I need help, people come to volunteer or people say, hey, Lou, I love the show. Is there some way I can be involved? I love to write. So, I've got a team of 30 blog writers. I've got newsletter editors, I've got people that help with events and graphics and, you know, the charity aspect of what we do. All these people want to do is just be a part of something that they enjoy, so I'm very grateful and very fortunate and very blessed and if people are looking to build their team, that's the first thing I tell them is to look inside and go right to your audience first.

Harry:
Yeah and you have a subject that people are just, tend to go pretty crazy about, right? Like, when you talk about people who are like diehards, you know, it's like Disney and there's a whole community of folks who are, you know, there's obviously, there's travel packages and businesses that are just centered around Disney and everything around that and people that can coordinate the trip for you. So, I imagine as your exposure grew and grew, is there like an ecosystem that you connected to where all these different folks that focus on different aspects of the Disney empire sort of, you guys get to talk every now and then?

Lou:
Yeah, there's the bubble, you know, there's sort of the Disney bubble and inside that bubble, there's a lot of Venn diagrams of some things that overlap, because there's people that love the parks, there's people that love the collecting. There's people that love the movies, they love the pins, they love, you know, Disneyland, so, there's a lot of overlap sort of inside that bubble. Look, it's a huge bubble and the Disney brand, I don't think any other brand can compete with it in terms of brand loyalty and the emotional connection that people have to Disney whether it's inside out making you cry or memories of going to Disneyland as a kid and being on your dad's shoulders. There is something very, very emotional and I think that's why people are so passionate about it?

Harry:
So, do you connect with those folks every now and again and maybe reach out for the opportunities to have them on the show? Like, let's say the person who specializes in just Disney figurines?

Lou:
Yeah, so I've been doing the show for ten plus years and I've never monologued the show. I've always had a guest with me. It could be a Disney legend, it could be a celebrity, it could be an artist. It could be a listener who is like, hey, I have an interest in this or here's an idea for a topic for a show. I'm like, cool, man, let's do it. The show, I say, is four people and by them and with them and, you know, they bring a lot of value and content to it. Again, they want to be part of it, so it allows me to have another voice and as I'm sure you know, it's a lot easier to do a two person show than it is to do a one person show.

Harry:
Yeah. I've done two solo episodes and you very quickly realize, like, you have to have a script you're reading from or obviously what's a good topic is you do a year end recap and at least you have something to talk about, but yeah, a lot of folks are doing a format where they invite someone on and they call them the co-host. I've seen that format used a lot to some success.

You mentioned that you had obviously some of your heroes and idols on and I listened to the episode you had with Julie Andrews, which was interesting to me, because in sort of a roundabout way, you know, I remember watching Mary Poppins when I was younger.

I was like, oh, you know, it was a fun movie, but then we were on Netflix, my wife and I, and we saw Saving Mr. Banks and so I said, well, that's interesting, Tom Hanks always puts in a good turn and it was funny, because it speaks to that mentality of like peering behind the scenes of what's going on and so this was like a behind the scenes of Mary Poppins and it completely, completely changed the movie.

It completely like, you know, I was like, wait a minute, did I see that movie, because…So, obviously, immediately after that, we go back to Netflix. We're like, Mary Poppins, man, let's go watch it again. So, we watch it again and it was crazy. It was crazy because you had the whole back story of like the story that was told in Saving Mr. Banks, you know, it just became that much more dramatic and every single thing that they did and when Mary Poppins was talking about, you know, the back story of where she came from and you're just like, wow, this is really, really had a lot of layers and I guess as a child you watch it and you get one layer, but then later on as an adult and especially knowing the back story, yeah, it was just fascinating when you have that opportunity to just see it on a whole bunch of different levels.

Lou:
Yeah that's one of the things, the great blessings of what I've been able to do is getting to talk to some of those people, you know, like a Julie Andrews, like a Richard Sherman and hearing the stories behind the stories about how a movie gets made or how a producer or Alan Menken, how music is made for Little Mermaid and Beauty and the Beast and all of a sudden you go back and you look at it with a completely different set of eyes.

Harry:
It must be, I mean, I know that it's something that you expect is going to happen, because you're in, you have a show about Disney and you have as a goal for you and for your audience to be able to speak to folks that you think would be of interest to the people who listen to the show. I'd imagine, though, there's still some aspect of that where you're like, wow, I can't believe I'm talking to this person.

Lou:
Yeah, dude, when I talked to Julie Andrews, like, I cleared the house. I had like nine recording devices going at the same time and they had told me like, look, you're going to get ten minutes worth and that's it and 45 minutes later, we're still chatting and I'm like and we finish and we're just talking and I'm like, Ms Julie Andre– and she's like, oh, call me Julie and I said something like, you know, how this movie has such a profound impact on my childhood and Sound of Music and she's like, oh, Lou. I'm like, oh my God, Mary Poppins just said my freaking name!! Are you kidding me? It was, you know, and it's one of those names that I knew my mom would know who Julie Andrews was. Like, she might not know anybody else, but like, alright, mom, look, look who I got to interview.

Harry:
We always have that moment. We have that moment where we had that guest that has recognition beyond our podcasting bubble and you're like, you know, even my wife sometimes, I'm like, oh yeah, I spoke to this person. Like, who? I have no idea who that person is and she's listened to some of my episodes. She's like, uh, I don't really know a lot of those names you're mentioning there. I'm not like your core audience.

I was like, okay, but it's funny, because I've been thinking, like actively about other people I'd like to speak to, because obviously as I'm speaking to podcast hosts, you know, initially I start in our cycle of internet marketing folks and business folks and I'm like, oh man, I want to spend out. I want to speak to people who do other things. Comedians and I was so. I mean, talk about having big aspirations, there's probably nothing bigger than Obama on being on Marc Maron's podcast. So, you're like, okay, that's it. Just aim big and figure out who you want to speak to, so like to that point, how's your wish list of folks you still go to speak to? Who do you have in mind?

Lou:
It's pretty short man, because Mary Poppins, like, Julie Andrews was like way up there and it was like, how did you do it? What's the secret? What's the formula? I'm like, alright, you want to know how I got Richard Sherman? I called him! They're like, what? I'm like, yeah, I sort of did some borderline stalkerish looking up online and I found his phone number and I called him and I talked to his wife for 45 minutes and three days later he was on the show and sometimes that's what it is. It's just as east as asking. The only person that I think I sort of have on my wish list is Michael Eisner who was the former CEO of Disney. I think he gets a bad rep. A lot of people remember him for how he left the company and why he left, but he foster so much change and so much positive growth, I would love to have him on one day.

Harry:
I imagine that's going to happen. Yeah, I always say you gotta put the intentions out to the universe, because if you don't even say out loud publicly what it is that you want, how can you expect for it to happen?

Lou:
Look, you know, you never know who is listening.

Harry:
Yeah, there's probably a Disney song we could insert at this point. Fairy tales can come true.

Lou:
Exactly.

Harry:
So, you talked about your content plan. You mentioned I think it was in your demo reel that you have on your website, but one thing that you said that stood out, you said podcasting is not enough and I think the point that you were trying to make there is if that's your only content strategy, then you need to do more.

Lou:
Absolutely. There's a fine line between the be everywhere philosophy and trying to do too much. What I think you need to do, like for me, podcasting is sort of the hub, right. It's the nucleus of what I do, but around that hub, I have many spokes of the wheel, right, so I do, you know, written content, I do video, I do live broadcasts every week. I'm a big proponent of taking things offline and doing events. I have audio products,video products, print products, magazine products, you know, personal. So, you have to have a lot of very diverse ways and it really boils down to creating content in the way that people are most comfortable in consuming it. So, some people might be the three minute video people. Other people might want to listen to an hour long podcast and the most that you create, the more monetization opportunities you can create as well.

Harry:
Yeah, you can't, yeah, it's really important, because you can't limit yourself and it's only when you find that one fan or listener that came in through a channel that you really weren't thinking too much about and you're like, wow, I didn't even realize that we should be putting, like you said, a three minute video or something on Instagram or a Tweet, because everyone has their favorite channel and when they come in through those channels, they usually tend to be repeat customers over that same channel and so you can't sort of, like you say, it just bares repeating that's very, very important to be, I guess, be everywhere, but be everywhere strategically.

Lou:
Be everywhere strategically and be everywhere organically, you know, there's some people that LinkedIn is going to work well for them and there's going to be no engagement on Snapchat where as for other people, they might, you know, YouTube might be the medium that's going to work best for their audience. You're going to find out what it is and then sort of really, you know, feed the beast on that side.

Harry:
How far ahead do you plan the content? I like how you're smiling when I asked you. You're like – I'm just wondering, because there's always, although there's a rich repository of things to draw from. Are you thinking one episode ahead? One month ahead?

Lou:
See, if I was smart, I would say listen, I know what the next ten episodes – sometimes I'm scrambling on Sunday. I'm like, oh my God. I gotta get a show out today. Alright, let's do a live restaurant review. Come on guys. It really depends. Again, it sort of goes back to what feels organic this week. I have a list of ideas that I have never really go to because this week I might say, oh, hey, there's a new Tomorrowland movie coming out. Let's talk about the top ten things we love about Tomorrowland or hey, there's this going on in the news, let's do a show about X and often times it really does come together that week. I wish I had three shows in the can so I'm not scrambling, but that's not often how it happens.

Harry:
That's funny. I know a lot of podcasters are shaking their head right now and they're like, oh, I can relate, because it's almost like the best laid plans and we're all not the John Lee Dumas machine recording eight episodes in one day and then you're set for the week, so.

Lou:
That model works for some people and, you know, different models work for others. I like just sort of, this is what I'm feeling today. This is what I'm feeling this week.

Harry:
So, all of this comes from your passion about all things Walt Disney World. Were their signs that this was coming? Like, if I were to ask your parents and I can see a bunch of collectables in the background as well, so is there some aspect to your nature where, like, oh, I asked your mom, like, so, how did this start? Well, Lou, you know, when Lou goes all in on something, he really dives head first.

Lou:
She probably would say that because, you know, as a kid growing up, if I was, you know, when I was into martial arts, I was all into martial arts. When I was in BMX, I had to have every single piece of equipment for my bike. Hindsight being 20/20. She'd say, yeah. He always had this love for Disney. We went every year. She probably never would have said it would have turned into a business. I don't think anybody would have predicted that, myself included.

Harry:
So, I'm assuming, you're older now, you have an appreciation for what exactly it takes to get kids into a car and to drive them to Walt Disney World or Disneyland.

Lou:
Yeah, man. You want to test the limits of your familial bonds, get in a car in the middle of summer and drive to Disney world for a week and then if you still love each other when it's all over, you got a good thing going.

Harry:
Man, I really like, you know, hats off to my dad, because like I said, we were in New York and we had – my grandmother lived in Los Angeles, he wanted to do the family road trip. You know, straight out of the Griswolds and he said, we're going from New York through Texas and over to California and we ended up at Disneyland. That's one of the trips. We also eventually did Disney World as well, but I mean, cross country is like four-five days, six days, and it's like, we're not old enough to drive. I was in fourth grade and so just a station wagon full of kids trying to – no iPads at that point and so, like, there's all the distractions nowadays, but I just can't imagine, this is like, early 80s. They're playing like the same ten songs on the radio or you have that cassette tape and after, you know, looping it around four or five times, you're like, okay. There's certain songs that stick with you just because you only heard them like 30-40-50 times.

Lou:
You actually had to talk to each other! I did it too, man. When I was a kid, my dad was a lawyer too and the courts used to close in August, so we actually took a five week road trip across country. We went across the top, came down and then came back through the south to Disney World and went up to Jersey again and I learned more in those five weeks then I ever realized I was at the time, but you're right, we had books, like, no digital devices.

We were talking, but thankfully, man, we had no cellphones. We had no pagers. Like, you did, you talked to each other. You played the serial game, the license plate game, you know. I know kids are Googling right now what that is, but you did, and now, not to sound all preachy, but you know, we're so busy doing this, we're looking down that we forget the face-to-face and that's why I do so much of my community, like, in person, because we forget the importance of the handshake and a hug.

Harry:
It's so funny, because we just happen to be coming out of the fourth of July weekend and so my wife made some really nice plans to head up to a place called Mammoth Lake. I hadn't heard of it and did some research. It was gorgeous, really just lakes, pristine mountains, we're right by Yosemite and it's something you just alluded to that ability to disconnect and reconnect with nature or with where you are on the road or taking the sties.

There's so may distractions nowadays and I found myself with some free time and I happened to have my phone with me and I saw I did have a signal, but I almost went out of my way to not look. I said, you know what, whatever it is, unless someone is dying, I don't need to know, I don't need to see that email, I don't need to see that tweet. I don't need to check traffic for my podcast. Like, we don't have those disconnection moments like, you know, they are so far and few between, we need to like with so much respect when we finally have them.

Lou:
I'm with you man, I do a group cruise with my audience every year. We do a Disney cruise. We go to the Caribbean. This year we went to Alaska and when I got wifi on the cruise, I'm like, nooooo! Man! Because it used to be when you went on a cruise, you had to disconnect unless, like, as a kid, I remember having a girlfriend, I had to go down the radio room and they had to radio in and connect you and it'll cost you $19 a minute, but now, you know, there's wifi on board, which is fast and I could live stream from the middle of the Atlantic Ocean, but I don't want to. We went to Alaska and I love, like you said, that pristine untouched beauty. I'm like, kids, man, see it with your own eyes, not through a lens. Put your phones down and just watch.

Harry:
Yeah, they almost have to be…

Lou:
And then they played Crossy Road, so..

Harry:
They have to be reminded by it, because it's almost like you're born into it. You know, you see two-three year old kids now. You give them an iPad and they instinctively know what to do within the couple of hours they've figured it out, so there's something innate about our ability to do that, but that doesn't necessarily mean we should be doing it.

Lou:
It's a different world, man. We have to just have the come to Jesus moment and accept it. It is what it is. As a parent, I know sometimes, I'm like, look, just let the kid on his iPhone for five minutes so they have five minutes of peace in the back of the car, so we do need to take a more proactive approach to, you know, you guys gotta put it down and sort of appreciate what you're seeing outside. That's why I like, you know, train trips and car trips and, you know, disconnect and just try to look out the window a little bit.

Harry:
Yeah, even flights nowadays, they've got the wifi in there, so hopefully it'll never allow people to talk on a plane, because that's almost like the last bastion of silence at like 35,000ft.

Lou:
I can either confirm nor deny that I've live broadcasted from 35,000ft before.

Harry:
We'll just leave it at that then.

Lou:
Yeah.

Harry:
How was Alaska?

Lou:
It's like having kids and what I mean by that is, people can tell you all about the experience up and down, but until you actually have it for yourself, the experience of what it's like for yourself, it is this untouched beauty and it just makes you realize how small you are in the grand scheme things and these beautiful glaciers that's a color you can't describe. I call it tesseract blue, because it's like, they're glowing this amazing blue color. It's spectacular. Specular.

Harry:
It's funny. I know exactly what you're saying, because I took my wife to see the Grand Canyon, because she's from Colombia, so I like to taking her to famous spots in this country and that feeling when your jaw just kind of like drops and everywhere you look there's nature. There's no buildings in sight. Like, as far as you can see, straight ahead, far as you can see, like, behind you, to the left, to the right, in the concerns of the Grand Canyon, it's like wow, just rock and rock and rock and just crazy. This past weekend it was just mountains and mountains and mountains and it's really awe and inspiring. It takes your breath away.

Lou:
It does, man. It's one of the things you can't – don't go YouTube it, don't go watch a video, look at pictures, like you need to go and see it yourself.

Harry:
What other parts of the country or even in the world have you seen that you can attribute directly to the WDW Radio?

Lou:
I'm laughing, because I do, I have like the best job on the planet. I'm sincerely grateful for the opportunities that come up, because I have – look, Disney World is my office, right? So, it's where I go sometimes to do work or research, but it's also let me go to Disneyland. I had to do work at Aulani, the Disney resort in Hawaii. I've gone on multiple cruises, for work, coasting cruise with my audience, but it's also lend to me doing a lot of speaking.

So, I've gone around the country. Going to the Philippines next year and I've gone to Cancun and all these things came out of one small stupid idea, like, oh, I'm thinking about writing a book and all I really know about is Disney and that little idea and the lesson is, the takeaway is, you never know what one little idea what might end up being and what it becomes and now, like I said, I just got back from Alaska and I'm going to the West Coast again in a couple of months and getting ready to announce another cruise for next year. So, it's been an amazing, amazing unexpected sequacious fun journey.

Harry:
Yeah, you are heading out to Tropical Think Tank.

Lou:
Yeah, man. I'm super stoked. I was like, wait a minute, Disney guy, you're going to the Philippines for work? How does that happen? I'm like, I have no idea.

Harry:
I've heard good things about that conference. I think it's the third year now, so everyone that goes either as a speaker or even as an attendee, they rave about it. It's really one of the best and most interesting and diverse conferences is what I hear.

Lou:
Yeah and I love Chris Ducker. I've known him for a number of years. I met him at conferences and yeah, the people who come back from Tropical Think Tank say it's a life changing experience, so I'm honored to be apart of it.

Harry:
It's going to take you probably a day to get there.

Lou:
Yeah. I'm trying to explain to my kids. Kids, the Philippines is literally on the opposite side of planet Earth.

Harry:
I did one trip years ago. I had a friend that I met when I was in Amsterdam and a couple of years later he's like, my parents have a house in Koh Samui in Thailand, you wanna come? I was like, free room and board? Yeah, sure. It's almost like one of those things you have to do at least once. Travel across the world and that was like 26 hours to get there, but it was fascinating, because you literally feel like you're in another world. You don't know the language, you kind of recognize the food. Everything is cheap. I think it's that everyone needs that experience where they really, really feel like most tourist feel when they come here, right?

Lou:
Yeah. I think you learn so much through travel. It really is the most impressive learning experience you can have.

Harry:
Speaking of travel and moving, what was the biggest shift for you being a Jersey boy and having to move to Florida? Obviously, you had made that point mentally, so you knew that you were going to end up there sooner or later, but was there anything you missed maybe besides the pizza?

Lou:
Dude, you hit it, man. The only thing I miss about New Jersey is the food. Like, man, a good pizza, a really good everything bagel, and that's about it, yeah. Like, good crusty Italian bread. That's all I miss from Jersey, yeah.

Harry:
How often you get back up there?

Lou:
Not often. I really, because when you move to Florida, everybody comes down here to visit you.

Harry:
Yeah, of course, because they love the weather.

Lou:
Yeah.

Harry:
By weather wise, are you in an area that has to deal with a lot of hurricanes or things like that?

Lou:
No. Everybody said, oh, you're going to move to Florida, there's storms all the time and Jersey got like slapped with three storms. Like, Hurricane Sandy came in, you know, I feel back, because I still have a lot of family and friends there, but it's a different lifestyle here, even taking Disney out of the equation, man. It's just a slower pace and the people are friendlier and there's palm trees and the sun is always shining and you never have to shovel sunshine and it's just a different way of life.

Harry:
You never have to shovel sunshine. I love that. Well, it's funny, because I can relate, because we moved, like I said, my wife is Colombia and she's like, ah, polar vortex? Enough. That's it and we were in New York during Hurricane Sandy too and I was like looking outside the window. We lived in East Village. The water was up to the tops of the car windows. There was a boat coming by at like 3am on Avenue (#54:12?) looking for people. I was like, this is crazy. So, I mean. I can relate to the palm trees. I'm staring at some outside my window right now and it's just a therapeutic effect.

Lou:
Absolutely and I have gone back to Jersey and, you know, you land in Newark airport. It's gray, everybody is mad and yelling at each other. I'm like, ick. And they're still doing construction in the same place they did construction ten years ago when I left. So, I don't miss it at all.

Harry:
So, bringing it back to the podcast, would you say that there's thing that you learn or that you were surprised about over the past? It's going on ten years now you said that you've been doing this and when you think about where you were when you started, any specific insights you've learned either in yourself or through the people you've spoken to?

Lou:
Yeah, you know, not to sound overly poetic, but everyday is a learning experience for me and I wasn't kidding when I said before that even the production of my podcast and the content that I produced and the way that I do it, I'm still always trying to learn. I'm still always trying to improve and obviously there's new technologies out that make it easier to create, easier to consume, you know, we talked in the past ten years, a lot of us old guys in podcasting about, you know, the growth of podcasting and the bubble bursting and this is now the renaissance or the second revolution or the movement or whatever it is that's going on now.

So, it's an exciting time. I think podcasting. I think we're still at the very, very tip at the podcasting iceberg in terms of saturation of the medium and the ease of consumption and once it gets much easier to consumer in cars and even on your phones and things like that, I think the growth potential for this medium is still huge, huge.

Harry:
Are there things as you think about the show that the show itself growing. Are there challenges that you see ahead of you and as you, I mean, are you looking to maybe expand the brand a bit more?

Lou:
So, I'm always looking to do what's next. I'm always looking to expand and everybody's like, well, don't you ever sleep? I'm like, no, man. I don't want to sleep. There's too much exciting stuff to work on. So, I am always looking to see what I can do to expand the reach, to be sort of on the cutting edge of whether it be technology or just different type of experiences that I can offer people.

So, I have been live broadcasting weekly since like 2007, so I dig what I'm seeing happening on things like Periscope and other mediums like that, because I think the real-time interaction and engagement is what was lost podcasting and pushing out content, which I was always starved for, so I love the fact that podcasters are getting more into having that very authentic very real-time, not just pulling back the curtain on themselves, but getting to sort of interact with their audience as well.

Harry:
Yeah. We live in interesting times. I can imagine what it was – it was exciting, I imagine, when you started, but now there's so much happening that, you know, everyone thinks, oh, it was late when I got started, you know, three or four years ago or maybe last year, oh, it's too late to get started, but even the people that are coming in now, I think, you know, as much as people hate to throw out the renaissance word, it's really fun times to be podcasting right now.

Lou:
Yeah and there's no such thing as being too late or too early or too soon. Listen, if you want to do it, just go do it and you'll find your voice and you'll find your way, but it is exciting and it's exciting for me too having been in the space for long to watch what's happening and I love watching new people starting to podcast, because the thing that differentiates this than things like terrestrial radio where you have to choose at 9:17 who you're going to listen to you and you can't fast forward and you can't go back. If you miss it, it's gone.

There's room for everybody, man. Like, we can all win. I want to see us all win. There's hundreds of Disney podcasts and I think there's room for everybody, because you can go back and you can pause and you can find the hosts or the content or whatever it is that you like. So, it's a very, very wide, very deep pond and I think everybody should come in, because the podcasting waters are very, very warm.

Harry:
So, I think just wrapping it up and you may have touched on it a bit earlier, but anything you didn't cover in terms of stuff that's got you excited? Really excited about what is happening in our industry. Excited about what's happening with you and what you're doing, what's top of mind for you?

Lou:
I think as the industry as a whole other than just, you know, worrying about me. I think what I'm excited to see is the shift. I'm starting to see the shift, because podcasting, you know, for a while and really even more so now, it's no longer the hobby that kids did, that 14-year-old kids were doing in their basement. Podcasting is serious, serious business and you see celebrities and big brands not making fun of poetasters any more, but jumping into the space and not always monopolizing the space, right.

It doesn't matter that you're a big brand, because you could be a little guy and still dominate a certain genre or a certain topic, whatever it might be, but more importantly as the old guard starts to shift away. I think we're going to continue to see the monetization of podcasts growing in a way that we still can't phantom, because when the old radio and TV guys and magazine and newspaper guys start to go away and the new ad buyers start coming in going, hey, look at this guy? He's a trust influencer with an incredibly targeted, loyal, demographic and look what this medium offers that the other ones don't. All of a sudden, the money is going to start to shift and I think we're just going to see that now, because as you know, there's a lot of guys – I'm no the only guy making a living as a podcaster.

Harry:
Who is your mentor? I mean, it doesn't have to be podcasting, but when you think of that word, who comes to mind?

Lou:
So, I lost my dad a few years ago. My dad still is my mentor. He still sort of hangs out on my shoulder, so when he died and I sort of had to become the patriarch of the family all of a sudden, this pressure shifts to you are now the guy that people looking for decisions, but when it comes to me going, man, like, I need to make a business decision. What do I do here? Do I pull the trigger on this? I say sort of, alright, what would my dad do? What's the – the answer is always, you know, doing the right thing is always the right thing. Like, you do the right thing and it'll all end up working out and that's sort of the way I sort of base my decisions. So, my dad still kind of mentors me based on what I think he would do.

Harry:
Yeah, it's almost like he's, like they say, if you lead with your heart, then you really can't go wrong.

Lou:
Yeah, man.

Harry:
One last off topic question, what would you say is the most misunderstood thing about you?

Lou:
Oh, I got a good answer to this question in so many different ways. The most misunderstood, you know what, what you see is what you get with me. So, the person that I am behind the microphone and on the show is the same person you're going to meet at a meet of the month, is the same person you're going to see, you know, at the sushi restaurant, because that's who I am and I don't try to be anybody or anybody different, because some people are like, oh, he's just, you know, he's doing a show, because he must be getting paid. I do what I do because I flipping love doing it, man, and if it all went away, I'd still be a Disney fan and I'd still be talking into the mic hoping that people would hear and I think, you know, that's part of the key. I think being authentic and being yourself.

My philosophy is very simple and it boils down to two words. It's stay hungry. You know, you stay hungry in your business. You stay hungry in life. You never be satisfied and look at me, man, clearly I stay hungry in my personal life as well, but hopefully people understand who I am on the show and who I am on social and everything else is really who I am in real life.

Harry:
Oh, I can definitely attest to that, because I had heard you a couple of times and shout out to Chris Murphy, by the way, he mentioned your show. He said, you gotta get Lou on, because he's really fantastic and that's my go to resource for all stuff Disney and he's actually one of the guys who inspired this podcast, so I thought I'd give a shout out. Like I said, yeah, when I had heard about you and when I heard the show a couple of times and then when I met you in real life. I was like, oh, he's exactly the same guy.

Lou:
I'm taller in person. That's what's misunderstood. I'm much, much taller in person.

Harry:
Yes, I can vouch for that. So, yeah, it's like, he's true, he's sincere and I'd imagine like your BS meter is pretty well attuned at this point and when you meet someone, you can know within 30 seconds whether it's someone you're going to vibe with, you're going to resonate with and those are really the type of people you want to hang out with.

Lou:
Absolutely and I think you surround yourself with people that are like you and I'm a positive person, so I believe in surrounding myself with positive people and good things happen for everybody.

Harry:
Well, I really, really appreciate you taking the time to come on the show, Lou. I'm really happy folks got to know hopefully a little bit more about you and maybe some Jersey secrets that you probably thought were going to stay hidden. I keep staring at your collectables behind you. Is there something there? Is there a prize possession on that wall where like if, you know, the whole fire – the house is on fire, what do you grab?

Lou:
Man, I ask that question to people all the time. I don't know my own answer. I do have a signed copy of the sheet music to Mary Poppins, signed by Richard Sherman who wrote it who I've become friends with over the years. I have an old A through E ticket book from Magic Kingdom back in the 70s. You know what, man, at the end of the day it's just stuff. You know, it's just stuff. I could live without it all, but I might grab my haunted mansion bat stanchion up there.

Harry:
Well, it's funny, because at the end of the day, it's the memories that you have in your mind that mean the most.

Lou:
Yeah, absolutely, brother.

Harry:
Alright, man. Thanks again for coming on and if folks want to track you down online, what's the best way?

Lou:
Cool, man. So, all of my Disney stuff is over at WDWRadio.com. My personal site is LouMongello.com and I am @LouMongello on all the social.

Harry:
Okay, so I do a little thing where I want to see if people listen to the whole episode, so I come up with a funny hashtag. I think for this one we'll make it #JerseyPizza.

Lou:
I dig it.

Harry:
Alright, so if you listened this far then tag Lou on Twitter and myself on Twitter and #JerseyPizza and let us know you enjoyed the show. Thanks again, Lou.

Lou:
Hey, man. Thanks so much for having me.

Harry:
So, what did I tell you? Is he the real deal or what? You can't tell me that attitude and that enthusiasm is not infectious and if you had to envision like who the person on the other side of the mic would be when you listen to the show and who would have the necessary enthusiasm and passion for a topic to host a show on Walt Disney World, I think Lou is the person you'd have in mind.

I had a blast talking to him and we chatted for a bit after the interview was over about reminiscing about some of our fun times in growing up in New York and New Jersey and we actually shared some music we had in common, so it was fun. It's always nice when I get to connect with someone from the East Coast, because I feel like there's a different mindset, different mentality for growing up, and it's nice to have points of reference that are similar. So, you heard the hashtag. It's #JerseyPizza. So make sure you put that in a tweet to Lou and to myself and we definitely appreciate it.

If you want to sign up for the newsletter just text 33444 and the word PodcastJunkies all one word and you are signed up for a PDF I put together for you that will help you be a bit more productive with your podcast, but more importantly, it lets you stay up to date with the episodes, because with all the ways to get blasted from a social media perspective sometimes, the streams coming back so fast, you get to miss all the things that are in your stream, whether it's on Facebook or Twitter.

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The main thing there would be to subscribe. I've been listening to other folks and have been reminded about this from other podcasts, but the key thing as much as I like a review, I think is a subscription so that you're always on a regular basis getting the shows pushed to you, so obviously, there's a bunch of different ways you can get updated, pick your poison, and thanks again for listening.

Bottom of my hear guys, I truly appreciate you coming in and it's really pushing me to be more consistent with the episodes, with the exception of the holiday hiccup last weekend. I'm definitely committed to getting this out weekly for you and it's really motivating me and anytime you can provide feedback, that is always appreciated. I think that's it. Have a fantastic week and we'll talk soon.

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