Ryan Williams Interview Transcription
Justin Sisley Interview Transcription

Harry Duran:
Here we are at NMX, but don't go far.
PODCAST JUNKIES. EPISODE 37.
I'm finally able to round up Mr Jared Easley – I've been having him on my list of potential guests for a while, and it just so happened that we were at NMX. We actually got to hang out for a little bit too, and I got to know him a little more than I did just virtually through online chats, and he's really as kind-hearted as I figured he would be – we found some time at the NMX booth. Thanks to Dave Jackson for helping set that up. So you'll hear the sounds of the showroom floor, and an interesting intro. I'll just leave it at that!
It was really fun to talk to Jared. We actually get to talk about his time in the Navy, his can't-miss sites from Biloxi, where he grew up, and why he considers himself a Southern boy, and how it paints his perspective on life. We also talk about the value of diversity and his days as a submariner and dealing with his claustrophobia issues. We also learn some lessons from the early days of the Starve the Doubts podcast, which now hosts with Kimanzi Constable, and I think something important that he learned was how he managed to temper his expectations with big-name early guests and how it didn't necessarily pan out from a marketing perspective, like he thought it would.
We talk about why it's important to lift up each other as fellow podcasters, and obviously we get into Podcast Movement – how it started, him and his vision going forward, and we were also able to answer some questions that I received ahead of time from Natalie Eckdahl and Vernon Ross, so shout out to those guys! We talk about his eBook and his now, new, traditionally published book that he's working on as well, so it's really an engaging and fun conversation. I'm really excited about having the opportunity to have finally met and had an interview with Jared.

Jared Easley:
Alright, are we going to rap?
Harry Duran:
I think we should rap.
Jared:
OKay, I'm going to beat-box, and then you just jump in and do whatever come to mind, okay?
Harry:
Okay.
Jared:
Like ‘Hi, we're at NMX, we're in Vegas', I'm sure you'll come up with the content.
Harry:
Yup, okay.
Jared:
Alright, here we go. [Beat-box]
Harry:
[Rapping] Here we are at NMX, but don't go far. I'm here with Jared Easley at the booth – we're trying to sound cool and not lose a tune, because he's rapping really hard, so you need to get in your car and come over and check us out tonight. We're going to be at the after party, aiit? That's what happens when we get down – a couple of guys from the 80s wearing a crown. That's how we do. Got the crowd going crazy, and you know it's true.
Jared:
I know it's true! I don't know if that's the line you meant to end on, but that was true, that was pretty good.
Harry:
The key to rapping over a beat-box is to watch your cadence –
Jared:
Oh no!
Harry:
And see when can I stick in a word that's not too long and that can rhyme, and I have to think ahead of time.
Jared:
I felt like my cadence might have not set you up for success!
Harry:
No, it's a different rhythm.
Jared:
Well, I'm extremely gringo, if you haven't noticed.
Harry:
You're probably the best beat-boxing gringo I've ever met.
Jared:
Well, even if that's not true, I appreciate you saying it.
Harry:
What's your favorite – you must have hip-hop influences, so what's your favorite hip-hop movement?
Jared:
Well it's funny you bring that up, because I'm doing a talk next week, and the talk is called ‘What podcasters can learn from Vanilla Ice'.
Harry:
[Laughs]
Jared:
And the three takeaways from the talk are: Stop, Collaborate and Listen.
Harry:
Oh man, that's going to be –
Jared:
And if you think about it, if you really apply those bits of advice in your life – stop listening to the voice that says you can't do something that has an impact.
Harry:
Yeah yeah!
Jared:
Collaborate with others, it increases the visibility of what you're doing and the likelihood of success. And then, of course, listen to what your people want, right?
Harry:
In case the listeners haven't figured it out, I'm talking to Jared Easley, Mr Starve the Doubts himself, star of the beat-box.
Jared:
Yeah, there's a reason I don't beat-box on my own podcast, I have to do it on yours! [Laughs]
Harry:
Yeah! I mean, I'm a child of the 80s, so I grew up on Beach Street, Breaking. You know when you watched shows and you were like ‘Oh man, I could do some of those moves'.
Jared:
Well, okay, were you ever in a talent show growing up?
Harry:
Does the basement of my parents' house count?
Jared:
I think it does.
Harry:
Then yes.
Jared:
Did neighborhood kids watch, or was it just you?
Harry:
No, we had a couple of neighborhood kids.
Jared:
Okay, so let's talk about that. Where was that?
Harry:
We did The Village People.
Jared:
[Laughs]
Harry:
I was the cowboy. [Laughs]
Jared:
As you should be!
Harry:
Yeah, and it was two other brothers and one sister, so I think we were able to get the military guy and the apache and all those other politically incorrect costumes.
Jared:
I think we should talk about this. Do you have a favorite Village People tune?
Harry:
Uh, that would be maybe YMCA?
Jared:
I think that's a safe answer.
Harry:
Yeah, it gets the party started.
Jared:
But I used to be in the military, so in the Navy, that's the joke that I would always hear when I was telling people I was going to the Navy. I was like ‘I'm going to the Navy', and then they'd go ‘Oh, in the Navy!', and I was like ‘You're so original and creative and funny…!'
Harry:
How was the Navy?
Jared:
That was an interesting experience because at the time, I was like the young kid from Alabama.
Harry:
Mhmm.
Jared:
And then basically [I was] immersed in this group of the ghetto kid from Chicago, the Hispanic kid from Southern California, the Mormon from Utah, the kid from the Bronx, the farm kid that grew up in Missouri. It was like this melting pot, and one of the things I remember was after bootcamp, we would all hover around the TV on Monday nights and watch Monday Night Raw.
Harry:
Oh, that's funny.
Jared:
And I thought – you know, wrestling actually brings people together, Harry, as strange as that is.
Harry:
Watching men in tights throw each other around –
Jared:
[Laughs] Which ties back into The Village People, so I love how you did that. You're very good at podcasting.
Harry:
When you painted that story, I thought of the movie ‘Biloxi Blues'.
Jared:
That's a good movie.
Harry:
Yeah. So were you the – what's his name? The actor?
Jared:
Ironically, my mother grew up in Mississippi, which is where Biloxi is.
Harry:
Yeah.
Jared:
Have you been to Biloxi?
Harry:
I have not.
Jared:
They have a lot of casinos there, much like Vegas.
Harry:
The showboats – they're boats, right?
Jared:
They're on the water. I think that's the law.
Harry:
Yeah, so it's ferry boats, or something like that.
Jared:
Yeah, but I'd say that if you ever get the chance to get to Biloxi, go ahead, why not?
Harry:
What's one thing I can't miss if I'm in Biloxi?
Jared:
Ooh, well, I'm going to say – I mean, this is the first answer that jumps into my head. Now, when I was in Biloxi, it was right after Katrina, right?
Harry:
Oh, that's tough.
Jared:
Yeah, so I would say the Hard Rock there is pretty good. I'm sure there's other stuff that's really good. I would say the Hard Rock.
Harry:
Do you consider yourself a Southern boy?
Jared:
I do.
Harry:
Yeah?
Jared:
Yeah, I've lived in other places. I've lived in Hawaii, I've lived in New England, but I've primarily grown up and lived in the South.
Harry:
What is it about being a Southern boy that paints your perspective on life?
Jared:
Interesting. I grew up where my High School was like 50% white and 50% African American. That was a public High School, and that was good because I started to learn a lot about diversity there, but I don't know, it's a funny story, I'll tell this. When I was in High School, I always liked the girls, but the girls treated me like I was their friend.
Harry:
Yeah. You were in the friend zone.
Jared:
I was in the dreaded friend zone, that was me. And they were like ‘You're like my brother'.
Harry:
That's not something you want to hear.
Jared:
Yeah, like, I don't want to be your brother. What do you do with your brother? It's Alabama, you don't talk about that. But what happened is when I joined the Navy, I don't know, I just got out of Alabama. I remember moving up to New England, and for some reason, in New England, I was different there.
Harry:
Yeah.
Jared:
And there was a movie that had just come out; ‘Sweet Home Alabama', with Reese Witherspoon.
Harry:
Oh yeah!
Jared:
And I was from Alabama, so all of a sudden, all of these girls that I wanted to talk to in High School, those types of girls in New England liked me.
Harry:
The fact that you were different.
Jared:
But back in Alabama, it was that old ‘He's my friend'.
Harry:
Yeah.
Jared:
And then I think going over to Hawaii, I started noticing other ethnicities and this is going in a weird direction, but I started realizing that there's pretty Asian girls out there, and that later goes into how I actually met my wife, which I won't get into that on this podcast! I think Alabama taught me a little bit about there's more out there than just in Alabama.
Harry:
That's an interesting moment, and it happens for everyone at different times. Like for me, I was in College and someone gave me the autobiography of Malcolm X, and I was like ‘Woah, this just kind of changed my world view'. So it happens either because of something you read, or in your case, you're placed into a different environment and you're like ‘Wow, there's people that are not like me, that are here and they have a completely different world view. They dress differently, they talk differently.' And it's interesting when you get that experience, and I think you need to have more of those because that's what the real world is like.
Jared:
I agree with you! I think the takeaway here is if you're in a certain circumstance or a certain situation, start looking for ways for you to kind of change that up. You don't necessarily have to change your demographics or geography, but how can you maybe read a different book or maybe listen to a different podcast or maybe try something a little bit different? There's some value in diversity, of course, and just in learning what else is out there.
Harry:
So as part of what you learned in the Navy, were there some aspects that you picked up from a technical perspective learned there as well? Or is that stuff you learned on your own?
Jared:
I think so. I was a submariner, which if there's anybody listening that's thinking about getting into that, you might not want to! That wasn't my favorite time of my life, but I did get to live in Hawaii, which was amazing, and I made tons of really great friends that I'm still close to on some level, I would say.
Harry:
What part of Hawaii?
Jared:
Oahu.
Harry:
Oahu, yeah, I was just in Kauai with my wife.
Jared:
Oh, Kauai is fantastic. It rains a lot, but it's still beautiful. Worth going to, for sure. I've been to Kauai and I absolutely love it. I just saw somebody riding by, that's interesting.. I don't know why he's on that. Leave that on the podcast.
Harry:
This is live, so we see strange things happening.
Jared:
There's a lot of stuff going on here.
Harry:
People riding by on a – I don't know what they're called, but it's a scooter for –
Jared:
Yeah, somebody who probably shouldn't be on a scooter is on it.
Harry:
Elderly people, and it's not an elderly person.
Jared:
Yeah. Did he rent that? He probably spent money to just drive around. In fairness though, this floor that we're on right now is massive, and it's only one of many.
Harry:
Yeah, it's kind of intimidating.
Jared:
It is intimidating.
Harry:
It's quite the opposite of a submarine, actually.
Jared:
It's like being on a submarine, or it's like being a white person moving to Hawaii, that's not necessarily a good thing.
Harry:
Did you work through your claustrophobia issues on the submarine?
Jared:
Never. No, those are always brutal.
Harry:
Yeah?
Jared:
Yeah. But to answer your technical question, I think that I definitely learned some things there that have served me well later on. I think the biggest takeaway is just dealing with different types of personalities – that served me well no matter what I've been involved in.
Harry:
I think from the podcast, The Starve the Doubts podcast, of which you are the host, and now with Kamanzi?
Jared:
Yup.
Harry:
You take a genuine interest in your guests, and I think part of what you alluded to in talking about how you get out of your comfort zone is what you brought to the show. When I started listening to your show in the first couple of episodes, you were just diving so deep on getting to know your guests and getting to understand what it was that made them tick, and trying to bring something out of them to show the listener: Hey, this is a new experience for you because you've never heard this person, or you may have heard them on another show, but you're not going to experience them the way you typically have because I'm going to ask different questions and I'm going to unearth different gems and highlight something of these guests. I thought that was something interesting, and not a lot of people were doing it at the time and putting the time into it.
Jared:
Yeah, I learned a valuable lesson from that – people appreciate it when you take time to really notice them. Another takeaway that might not be as – I won't say it's a negative takeaway, I don't know if that came out right, but what I'm getting at is I learned a valuable lesson.
I learned that in the beginning, I was trying to interview people that were really successful, and I had some cool opportunities from that, but my expectations weren't realistic. I thought ‘Hey, if I can have, let's say Gary Vaynerchuk on the podcast', Gary's going to naturally share this out because that's what happens, and then I'm going to gain all this momentum and traffic. While Gary and others were super gracious to be on the show, and I am still blown away at that, they didn't share it, and I thought ‘Well they should have!'. But that's not their responsibility, to grow my platform or my network or to bring exposure to my business. And I learned that the hard way.
Harry:
Yeah.
Jared:
And it took me a while to start to figure that out – Hey, what's wrong with me? I'm not really getting a lot of –
Harry:
Traction?
Jared:
of momentum here. I'm having all these great conversations with people and I'm putting tons of time into researching what they're doing, and they like me, they say thank you, but they're not sharing it.
Harry:
Yeah, it's sort of like a dead-end street at that point.
Jared:
Yeah, I realized there's more value in having conversations with people who are in the trenches, working through those processes, but also understand what it's like to be where you and I are sitting, and they're willing to share the episode, but they're also willing to share their experience.
Harry:
Yeah, because I think we're all working through this together, and we're sort of at the same level where we're trying to figure out what's the best way to promote the show in a way that's beneficial for me, and beneficial for you. If people can get to know Jared Easley more as a result of listening to my podcast, then I feel like I've done you a service because I want people to know you. I want people to know how cool you are, I want people to know how generous you are, and there's a lot of co-mingling of audiences, obviously, but at some point there's people who have never heard of you. They'll listen to the show, and there are people who listen to your show and that have never heard of me, and etc etc. I think we all lift each other up – a rising tide lifts all boats.
Jared:
Yes! That's a favorite quote of mine from John F. Kennedy, I love it. And I love that abundance mindset that you just described; that's key to growth. When you can find people like fellow podcasters that we connect with, most of the people in this space understand that and they get it. Worst case scenario, we've made some really good friends, and that's not a bad thing.
Harry:
So what's funny is the transition into the conference, Podcast Movement. I think as you started doing your podcast and realizing the network that you're building as a result of having people on your show and being on other people's shows, although there are some conferences – NMX has a podcasting track – I'm wondering what the mindset was when you thought about putting the conference together with Dan Franks and a couple other folks, and if that was in your mind as in ‘This concept of network – let's bring it into a live forum', if you will.
Jared:
I think we started by asking the question: Could we do it? And then following that with: Should we do it?
Harry:
Yeah.
Jared:
We didn't have experience with big events, and so most people said ‘Yeah, maybe it's not a good idea'. But if you get good advice from people who have done it, and then you validate the idea, it's not necessarily a bad thing. Kickstarter and crowd funding allowed us to test without putting tons of resources and time into something that we didn't know would work. And you know the story, Harry, we did the Kickstarter, we were successful with that and then last year we did the event for the first time. [It was] a lot of work, but we had 600 podcasters come to it, and that was a big ‘Aha'. It was like ‘Okay, podcasters want to connect and this event was needed. The industry, or the group, spoke and the community said ‘We want this', so now we're doing it again.
Harry:
So I was able to post that I was interviewing you –
Jared:
Uh-oh!
Harry:
On Instagram, and I got –
Jared:
Was that the rap portion of our interview?
Harry:
[Laughs] No.
Jared:
Okay.
Harry:
Because I don't know if people would have responded to that, but The Biz Chix Podcast, Natalie Eckdahl –
Jared:
Ah yeah, we like Natalie.
Harry:
Yeah, so Natalie said ‘I'd love to know how he got inspired, and the guts, to launch Podcast Movement', which I think you touched upon. “How has the team and back-end changed since PM14? What is the vision going forward?”
Jared:
I think the vision going forward is to continue to grow the community and that isn't necessarily the responsibility of Podcast Movement, although we are making a conscious effort to provide more opportunities for female podcasters to speak, create more opportunities for other niches. Year one was mostly our network, which at the time was heavily business and marketing podcasts. And there's nothing wrong with it. Again, we had to prove the concept of ‘Could we do it? Should we do it?', and that was our network.
But this next year, we've reached out to other niches. We want to have people who've got experience in broadcasting and are now leveraging that in the podcast space. We want people who have that artistic experience. We have Lea Thau, who created The Moth, which is –
Harry:
Yeah!
Jared:
I mean, she's a Peabody Award-winning broadcaster, she knows what she's doing.
Harry:
And the host of Serial.
Jared:
Well, Serial, Sarah Koenig, my goodness! That's one of the biggest podcasts on the planet. Aisha Tyler, we've just named three big female speakers, but then we've got Roman Mars and Pat Flynn of course, and John Lee Dumas to appeal to that original audience. And then Lou Mongello who's the Ric Flair of podcasting awards, to tie it back into wrestling. Speaking of wrestling, Colt Cabana is doing the Academy of Podcaster Awards Ceremony.
Harry:
Okay.
Jared:
Yeah, just so many good things are going on. I think that's where Podcast Movement is evolving; there's so many cool circles in the podcasting space, like comedy and obviously business is one of them. There's multiple spaces, and now those circles are starting to intersect.
Harry:
Yeah, I like that that's happening.
Jared:
And we're hoping to be a part of that happening, and we feel like this year is a good effort for that.
Harry:
I think you guys are really primed to make those different circles merge into one podcasting family. And what I really applaud you on is listening to the attendees last year, because I know a lot of people came up to you and said ‘Great job, guys, here's what was good, here's what was bad', and I think people were talking about the entrepreneurial focus last year, and I think this year, when you started lining up these new guests and speakers, I think the incremental growth is really faster than some people thought.
[Maybe they thought] ‘this is going to take them 3-4 years to get to the point where it's a really established conference for podcasters, but I think at year two now, with the line-up you guys have gotten, it's really established your credibility in the conference base. You're pretty much the go-to conference for podcasters at this point.
Jared:
Yeah, I feel comfortable saying that that's true. A take-away is year one, there were different companies we reached out to, and we just had not proven ourselves yet, and they were not prepared to be supportive of something that did not have some kind of track record, so that was tough.
Harry:
Yeah.
Jared:
And we really appreciated the people that supported year one, because they believed, even when they could have easily said ‘Oh, you don't have a track record'. But year two's been interesting because now there's people who saw what happened in year one, they were lurkers, they were looking from the outside and they realized: ‘Oh my goodness, this is something that has potential, this is something we want to be a part of'. So that's been exciting too, to embrace new people who are willing to be a part of it now. They needed to see some proof, we get that, that's Business 101, but now those people are coming in and hopefully, that's just going to continue to add to the community as a whole.
Harry:
And the other thing is the folks who were attending – I was there, I literally bought my ticket the first week that something was posted on Twitter, and I said ‘Uh, a conference just for podcasters?' I think I bought that first week, I was so excited about that opportunity. We're your best cheerleaders, because we were there last year and I can't even imagine what it's going to be like this year.
Jared:
It's interesting; we absolutely love New Media Expo and we're thrilled to be here, and it's been fun running into a lot of podcasters at New Media Expo, but what's interesting is that Podcast Movement is typically the conversation that we're hearing. Right or wrong, but that's kind of neat.
Harry:
So the other question was from Vernon Ross, and he was wondering how do you decide who's going to headline a conference, and who do you give precedence to? These are decisions that you didn't have to make last year, because when you're bringing in people of star quality, one of the things Vernon was asking was: Could it be that it's too intimidating for podcasters? Because if you have a newbie podcaster coming in and Sarah Koenig is there, [could they worry] ‘I can't relate to her. Is there something that she's going to talk about? Or could I just be going in as a fan of the show?'
Jared:
I think it's more likely going to be the podcaster. It's possible that there would be fans, but I think it's primarily going to be podcasters. But to Vernon's question, events are tricky and as an organizer, you need to have opportunities that are going to draw on what people are interested in. There's no question that people are interested in Serial, and a narrative style podcast is gaining a lot of momentum. We're seeing those types of shows do really well in Stitched and iTunes, so it makes sense to highlight and feature some of those people, but it also makes sense to bring in sports, it makes sense to bring in comedy.
I think we made the decisions based on who are people that are really relevant and doing a great job in those spaces, and then how do we not turn our backs on somebody who's got some experience but they're just not on top? I think those people need a voice too, and I'm really proud of the fact that one of our keynote speakers this year is Lou Mongello. Lou hasn't really keynoted any type of podcasting-related event, but he's spoken at so many events. He's never been given the main stage, so we're like ‘No, we're gonna give Lou the main stage'. Last night, he won another podcasting award. The guy is a great speaker, he's a great presenter, he's a great podcaster. We're thrilled to be giving him his first podcasting keynote.
Harry:
That's awesome.
Jared:
Yeah, and he was just a normal break-out sessions speaker last year, and that's something Dan and I were talking about – for people that really shine and bring it at Podcast Movement, there's a possibility you could be keynoting the next year. I feel like it's a pretty fair event – the awards are fair, Stitcher Radio is with us on that, they're going to do half the nomination and the other nominations are going to come from a traditional nomination process, and then we have an Academy. It's a group of qualified podcasters who are going to be voting on the winners. Somebody could win a podcast award not based just on popularity, it's pretty cool.
Harry:
Yeah, it's by podcasters, for podcasters, from podcasters. Whatever it is, what's great about that approach that you described is you know Lou Mongello personally, and you've seen his rise in podcasting over the course of the years.
Jared:
Right.
Harry:
And like you said, you want to reward the fact that he's just increasing his reach and he's just fantastic at what he does, and giving him the keynote stage, I think, is really awesome.
Jared:
Yeah, we're very proud of that.
Harry:
In addition to the podcasts and in addition to the conference, you also had time to release a book.
Jared:
[Laughs]. Okay, so I did a self-published book last year, and now I've co-written a book with my co-host, Kamanzi, which you mentioned, and he had a relationship with a publisher. I didn't think the publisher would pick up this book because I don't have a published book deal, but they had first writer refusal for that book, Harry, and so we presented the book to them and they wanted it. Now I have a traditional published book deal, the book's coming out later this year, and it's just a humbling thing to think that just last year I was working on a self-published book, and now I'm going to have a book in Barnes & Noble. In several months, I'll be able to take my wife and daughter into our Barnes & Noble and see that book on the bookshelf. That's cool!
Harry:
That is really cool.
Jared:
That's crazy.
Harry:
So that really drives the question for the folks who are keeping track of everything you've been working on: What is it that drives you to keep creating? The common threat for all those things, if you think about the podcasting, if you think about the conference, if you think about the book – it all lends to you being a creator. Is that something that you find is inherent in your DNA?
Jared:
I think so. I think you have to really want to create and have a desire to serve and bring value, and if you do and you're generous and you're wanting to help others and not just be greedy and focus on yourself, I think people pick up on that. So for me, yeah, I like to create, I like to be involved and in this case, we had a solution to a problem, we wrote about it and now it's going to be a book that's going to be out there. There's no prediction on what the results of that book will be, but it's a cool opportunity, nonetheless.
Harry:
And I think you're the type of person – for folks that do know you, you're very generous with your time, and you're always active and trying to reach out to folks, saying ‘How can I help you?' Is that something that you were taught at an early age?
Jared:
I think it's from learning what not to do. I wish I could sit here on this podcast and pretend that everybody has just hooked me up and been so kind to me. I've had people step on me, I've had people manipulate me, I've had situations where I've given and given and given to people and they've just used it to their own advantage, and I've realized that's not the way I want to treat others. I've been in a corporate setting where I was number one in the entire company in billing, and it got me nowhere. I remember just thinking ‘That's broken, that's not the way I think business should be, and that's not the way I want to continue to be in my professional life moving forward'.
I learned some things that weren't bad – they helped me make decisions based on those experiences, and I think now I realize the value for me is that abundance mindset as we talked about. It's about not being a fool, not just hooking everybody up just to do it, but be generous, be kind, be respectful, but also be intentional and be strategic.
Harry:
I ascribe to that as well because I'm a big believer in just feeding off of people's energy.
Jared:
Yep.
Harry:
And you can usually tell within the first 30 seconds if you want to associate with a person that you've met for the first time. It's something about the vibe, their mojo, whatever you want to call it, or just if they radiate love – you think ‘This person's cool, I can hang out with this person', and those are the types of people you want to associate yourself with, and those are the types of people you want to help. It's not like you're keeping score, but the universe is cyclical, right? If you give enough, it has to come back.
Jared:
We've had people reach out to us about Podcast Movement, and we can tell just from the first email, ‘Yeah, this person is not looking out for Podcast Movement, they're 100% looking out for themselves', and we're not looking to feature those types of folks.
Harry:
That's awesome that you have just really good-hearted people behind it, like Dan and yourself. I think from the inception of it, it's headed down a fantastic path. I'm really excited and I wish you guys all the best of luck with that.
Jared:
We are fellow Podcast Junkies.
Harry:
[Laughs] Yeah, that's why the name fits, because we're all so passionate about it. We feel like we can't talk enough about it, and at Podcast Movement, more of that is going to be happening.
Jared:
Yeah, my wife doesn't like hearing me talk about podcasting. She's like ‘Ugh, he's talking about it again!'
Harry:
Yeah, I get that. It's like ‘Do you have your headphones on? Are you listening to another podcast?' And then I listen to it at 2x speed because I feel like Neil in the Matrix when he's downloading like ‘Do you know how to fly that helicopter?'
Jared:
‘Yeah, now I do'.
Harry:
‘Now I do'. It's like that's what's happening. My theory on this, and I've talked about this with Chris Murphy.
Jared:
I love Chris, he's a great friend by the way. We used to be in a band together, I don't know if you knew that.
Harry:
That's right, he told me that. For those listeners that may not know, I got the idea because Chris Murphy introduced Cliff Ravenscraft at the last NMX.
Jared:
Ah!
Harry:
And I saw him speak, and I said on Twitter: ‘Who's the guy who introduced Cliff?', and Cliff responded, ‘It's my friend, Chris Murphy'. So I said ‘Chris Murphy, where are you?', and we tracked each other down the hallways. I said ‘I've got this idea for a podcast, because I'm a podcast junkie, and then the show was born there.' I thought initially maybe I would do it with him, and I had Chris Murphy on the show as well.
Jared:
Yeah, I know that, Chris is amazing.
Harry:
He's a really, really good guy. So just to bring it all home, what has got you, in general, excited about what's coming up for podcasting and podcasters in the upcoming year?
Jared:
Seeing the collaborations, people wanting to work together, the community wanting to come together and help each other out – that's exciting. And then seeing more and more corporate-type identities that are getting into this space, I think it's good for the space. I think it brings more visibility and awareness to podcasting. I don't think NMX's alignment with NAB is a bad thing at all, I think it's kind of cool. Over time, I believe we'll see a little bit of a warmer reception to podcasting – I think this year is just kind of working through the kinks and figuring it out. They'll do that, and over time – podcasting's not going away, so I think it's a cool time to be involved in podcasting. It just seems like more and more opportunities are going to be created.
Harry:
And as someone who likes to help people out whenever you get the opportunity, is there anything that you're working on that the listeners can help you out with, as a sort of paying it forward?
Jared:
I think Podcast Movement. If you can be at Podcast Movement, if that interests you, please do. If it interests someone in your circle, someone in your network that you think would benefit from that, please be willing to share it with them – they may know about it, but just say hey ‘You've got to be at this, this is good'. So I'd say Podcast Movement is number one, and then of course, I've got a book out there if podcasting, again, is interesting to you and you want to grow your audience. I wrote a book called Podcasting Good to Great: How to Grow Your Audience Through Collaboration. I think it's $0.99 on Amazon because I didn't want cost to be an issue – $0.99 most people can handle. It's a book of different strategies that I've learned that have worked well for me, and now I've gotten hundreds of emails from people who've applied this and seen opportunities open up because of it. If you're podcasting and you want to grow, that's a good book to consider checking out.
Harry:
And you're doing the satellites as well? You were at Podcast San Diego, right?
Jared:
Right, so Podcast San Diego, we've got Chicago coming up, and Boston, Atlanta. Those are opportunities because we know some folks just can't travel, but they might come to a one-day event in their region. The verdict's still out on that. We've done two – we did one in Orlando, one in San Diego, but both were really positive. We had more people than we thought would come, so we feel like we're on a reasonable cycle with that. So Chicago's the next one, and we're just finalizing everything with that, and that'll be May 23rd. I believe we're seeing more and more people and podcasters that want to come together from different circles that we talked about, and that's exciting. Not all those people are going to go to Podcast Movement, but that's okay, we still see the value in growing a community that way.
Harry:
So I actually have real-time feedback for you on Podcast San Diego.
Jared:
Uh-oh.
Harry:
Again, from Natalie Eckdahl: “Podcast San Diego was the best podcasting content I have received in 2015.”
Jared:
Incredible.
Harry:
“And I was at SMMW15 and NMX15”.
Jared:
Well, when you think about that, the speakers at Social Media Marketing World were outstanding, so to say that you got really good value and content from a much smaller event with not the powerhouse names, I think that says a lot. We had really good speakers at Podcast San Diego, and they weren't all rockstars, but they had a great message to share, they had good advice from their experience, and people related to that.
Harry:
That resonates more with people.
Jared:
Yeah, I can relate to Harry because Harry's in the trenches with me, and you have some things that you've learned that I haven't tried yet. That worked for that audience, and we're proud of it.
Harry:
So, Jared, thank you so much for being on Podcast Junkies, I know we've been trying to work this out for the longest time possible, but in the best way possible, everything happens for a reason at the time it's meant to happen. I know you're a firm believer in that, and I'm glad that we were able to do it here in a more intimate setting. You're my first live (AKA kind of, sort of, live) – even though the episode will be out in a week or two. But it's nice to get the buzz of the conference while you're doing the show.
Jared:
I kind of hope we can still be friends, Harry. Can we leave on another rap? I thought that was a good way.
Harry:
I think we can. Let people know where to find you first.
Jared:
Okay, so the event is Podcast Movement (www.PodcastMovement.com), and if you want another podcast, first of all listen to all of Podcast Junkies. When you run out of episodes, there's maybe a little room for something else, Starve (like you're hungry) – Starve the Doubts is a podcast that Kimanzi and I do.
Harry:
Fantastic show.
Jared:
And it's definitely worth checking out after you've listened to Podcast Junkies.
Harry:
Okay, so we're going to take you guys home, or bring you guys home, or whatever you say –
Jared:
Well this is the exit rap, so you've got to pay attention to the cadence. Does my cadence need to be a little slower?
Harry:
Maybe a little faster.
Jared:
A little faster? Alright. I like the challenge.
Harry:
So this is our customized outro for Podcast Junkies.
Jared:
I think my beat-box is going to be the same as before, but in my mind, it'll be faster. Here we go.
Harry:
[Rapping] Yes. Thank you for coming on the show, Mr JARED. You know you're down with me. ‘Coz I'm a PODCAST Junkie. I like to record and sound funky. I go down the street with my monkey. Yeah, I said monkey. I've got a pet monkey. And he podcasts too.
Jared:
Nice!
Harry:
Awesome.
Jared:
Monkeys, we worked in monkeys!
Harry:
I don't know, I was thinking what rhymes with ‘junkie'.
Jared:
It does rhyme.
Harry:
Alright, if you've stayed this long –
Jared:
Well played!
Harry:
If you've stayed this long in the show, then tweet to @JaredEasley
Jared:
#monkeyrap
Harry:
#monkeyrap – done! It's a wrap. Peace.
—-
Harry:
So I told you it would be different, right? That was a lot of fun and I think it's just a testament to how relaxed and spontaneous Jared can be when he's given the opportunity, so I'm really glad. I don't know if he's actually beat-boxed on anyone else's show, so if he has not, then I feel very honored. So it was a great conversation, I'm sure you'll agree. I wish it could have gone on a little bit longer; we might have to have him back at some point in the future. He's got a lot to talk about, he's obviously working on a lot of things: the Podcast Movement, the books, and the actual podcast ‘Starve the Doubts', with Kimanzi. So I think it was just great to get some insights into a little bit of his background as well – we talked about the value of diversity and how he managed to temper his expectations with the famous guests in the beginning.
I just really love the roadmap that they've got laid out for Podcast Movement, especially with those big name guests – Sarah Koenig from Serial, and some other big-time headliners that are going to be there. I think it's going to be fantastic. For a year two event, I think it's awesome.
He's really excited about finding his book in Barnes & Noble – I think when that happens, that'll be a nice confirmation of all the work he's put in going forward. We also heard about how being a creator is inherent in his DNA, and I think that's very, very clear if you've followed his work over the past couple of years. And just getting to talk about what has him excited about podcasting is really, really inspirational, and it really keeps all of us fellow podcasters moving as well.
Once again, I hope you enjoyed that; I had a fantastic time with him and let me know what you think about the show, give me some feedback. As always, we love to have reviews on iTunes because it helps the show grow and helps more people find it, and more people get to hear about all the fantastic guests I have and then you get to hear more about their background. If you've got some time today, head on over to www.PodcastJunkies.com and you'll see all the links there, and you can take care of that there.
Have a fantastic week, guys, and I'll talk to you next week.

Ryan Williams Interview Transcription
Justin Sisley Interview Transcription