Ray Ortega Interview Transcription
Ari Meisel Interview Transcription

Transcript

Intro: Our mission is to impact 100 million people, what balls to name it Satori Prime. A moment of enlightenment to moment of greatest strength, vigor, or financial success. I was like, so good! Now, we actually got to live up to it and deliver on that.

Harry Duran:
Podcast Junkies episode 27. This week we talk to the brothers Ilan and Guy Ferdman. I think it's only the second time that I've had two guests at once. I heard about Ilan through the Ari Meisel podcast, Less Doing, which I've mentioned a couple of times. Big fan of productivity and I thoroughly enjoyed Ilan's interview. I think what hit me the most was his energy level and his enthusiasm. It was just infectious and I really wanted to learn more about who this guy was, how come I never heard about him before? So naturally I started digging deep where Ilan for the most part, sometimes Guy, serves as host and they do a bang up job.

I was really hooked and I wanted to go and find the story behind the podcast. Naturally what podcast junkies would do, I went to the beginning and downloaded the first episode and I listened from there. It was just fascinating how they got the idea from starting with YouTube videos for their company, Satori Prime, and then moving into podcast space.

It was just interesting to learn as he did about some of the new podcasters and some of the old ones that I had already heard about and had to hear Ilan discovering them and talking about them and sort of give cliff note version of some of these shows, which was really interesting to hear. I was drying to have them on and I reached out and they said yes! I was pretty happy about that. Fast forward to this conversation, I was lucky enough to get them both on the line and we cover a wide range of topics. *Laughter*.

Everything from how plant medicine has changed Guy's view on life to the importance of living with a purpose and the importance of personal connections, how they're podcasts is taking their business to another level, and cover everything.

I mean, we cover grade school and we talk about Ilan's child and his thoughts on what he might do when it comes to making a decision whether or not he's going to college. So, the one warning I will give to our listens, to my listeners, to the audience, is there's prolific use of the F-bomb on this particular episode. More than I've noticed on other episodes, so I just wanted to give you a friendly heads up that if there are kids in the back seat if you're listening to this in the car, then you might want to pause and pick it up a little later, but definitely pick it up indeed, because it's a fantastic episode.

It's energizing for me just to hear it again it was during the conversation and I think you'll get a feel for just how powerfully it affect me based on my feedback and my conversations with Guy and Ilan, so I really, really enjoyed it and without further adieu, Guy and Ilan Ferdman of Satori Prime.

So thanks Guy and Ilan for coming on Podcast Junkies.

Ilan Ferdman:
Awesome, happy to be here.

Guy Ferdman:
Glad to be here, man.

Harry:
So, for the listeners, the reason why I have Guy and Ilan on is I'm so freaking pumped and, by the way, feel free to drop F-bombs as you like. *Laughter*.

Ilan:
Yes.

Harry:
I already know.

Ilan:
Like, in your email, you're like, by the way feel free to drop F-bombs, I was like..

Guy:
Language included. *Laughter*.

Harry:
Exactly. For folks who don't know they're the hosts of the Performance Enhancing podcast with some of the most creative art I've seen actually. Who did your brain with the muscle pump?

Ilan:
I don't even know who we hired. It was someone..

Guy:
No, no. It's 99designs.

Ilan:
Oh, 99design.

Guy:
Yeah, 99designs.com. Obviously we're from Jersey so we're just around steroids around times so it makes perfect sense.

Ilan:
*Laughter*.

Harry:
I can hear it in your voice because I'm from New York and I just moved from LA like four months ago, but you know when you're speaking to someone from the east coast, someone from Boston, someone from Jersey, someone from New York. They just carry themselves in a different way.

Ilan:
It's true.

Harry:
It's definitely contagious.

Guy:
A little bit too much strut in those jeans.

Harry:
What's funny is that the way you carry yourself and the way you come across in a podcast, it almost gives you a visual of who that person is without having to see them. I know you guys do the podcast on YouTube as well. Is there a reason why..did you start on YouTube and then you moved to the podcast or did you do them both at the same time?

Ilan:
No, we actually just started doing only audio and then people were like bitching about they couldn't get iTunes, because we had a pretty decent size following as Satori Prime before we ever did the podcast. So, people that we knew were like, “I can't get your podcast.”, “I hate iTunes.” And they loved our videos, they were just like, “Can you just throw it on YouTube?” I think it was like, it was pretty early on, but it was definitely probably like 17-20, something like that, where I was like, look, I'm recording them anyway, what's the difference of just turning on a video and having people see me on video?

Yeah, it's been great because…there's a ton YouTube subscribers. Our YouTube channels gone up and that all feed into, you know, people checking out our website, organic traffic going through the roof. So there's a lot of benefits to having multiple mediums.

Guy:
Absolutely. You gotta be every where today. I mean, you just have no idea how people are consuming information. Like, I think one of the biggest mistakes is presuming…they say what happens when you're assume, you make an ass out of you and me. So, it's kind of the same thing with online marketing. When I meet somebody today, do I Snapchat you? do I Facebook you, do I call you? Skype you? Like, how do I get you? It's kind of the same thing when you get online today.

You really need to show up in a lot of mediums and obviously podcasting is one of our favorite mediums to date, but I, again, just like Ilan said, it's growing it in a lot of variations. Like, why do people follow you? It's personal. They love your perspective, they love your message, but there's something..what online medium is lacking is some personal connection like right now we're on Skype, right, and I can see you, but the thing that I've been dying for is somebody to place the camera in the middle of the screen, so that when I look at myself, I'm really looking at you, because that's what you tend to do, right, is look at yourself, because we need to know what we're doing. It's missing that eye contact, so at least at some level people can see you, but it creates that weird celebrity phenomenon.

Like, I live south of you. I'm in San Diego. There's a place over here called Belly Up, which is like a place for music and I walked in and I saw the guy grab my ID and look at me, look at my ID, look at me, look at my ID, and it's going on for way too long and I'm like, “Is everything okay?” and he's like, “I know you, don't I?” and I'm like, “Mmm..I don't think so.” And he goes, “You're Satori Prime, aren't you?” It was the weirdest shit ever. I'm like, “Okay…yeah, I am?” Like, is that a good thing or a bad thing.

Ilan:
*Laughter*.

Guy:
Like, is this a customer that like likes me, pissed me off, sees my stuff and hates me, trolling, I don't know, and he's like, “I love your stuff. Can we get together for lunch?” But, it's just that celebrity thing. You want that closeness. For me, it's really important that we have that, and I know for him it is too. It just creates the right bond.

Harry:
Yeah, it's funny that experience. Every podcaster if they've done enough episodes they have that moment. We went to the Podcast Movement, a couple of friends of ours, people that I'm friends with. I don't know if you guys have heard about it, but it was a conference in Dallas, Texas and it's just for podcaster.

Guy:
Kay.

Harry:
It's called Podcast Movement. It was put on by the guy, Jared Easley who does Starve The Doubts podcast and a guy by the name of Dan Franks, who had Entrepreneur Challenge or something podcast. Anyway, they got together, got with a couple of old schoolers, and they literally did a KickStarter for 10 gran, got funding up to 30 grand and said, “Wow.” They sold out the tickets on KickStarter in like 24 hours.

So there was definitely a need and you guys should definitely check it out. I will be next year as well. I think it's going to be in June or July in Texas again. It's amazing. We talked about it a little before the call, when you're around your tribe of people, and imagine, not just bloggers and YouTubers and podcasters, this is specifically podcasters.

Ilan:
Yeah

Guy:
Yeah

Harry:
So we're all geeking out on everything, episodes, what's your interview is like, what's your style is like, what mic you're using.

Guy:
I was just about to say what microphone you're using, exactly.

Ilan:
*Laughter*.

Harry:
You're with your people I'm trying to say, which is an amazing feeling.

Ilan:
Nice.

Harry:
So, talk about the genesis of it. How did it start? You listened to a couple and you figured it was an interesting way to get your message out and you decided to jump on board?

Ilan:
So, really funny. I'm very similar to you. I too am a Podcast Junkie. I too love just taking on that information and what I kind of noticed about podcasts was some of them are, like you said, the ones you don't really like which are really scripted, seemed to me like there's a lot of fluff and not a lot of meat. So, I'd listen for like an hour and I remember I was listening to I Love Marketing. I mean, I really love that podcast, but I was like, “You know what? I just listened for an hour and 15 minutes, I could have done a wrap up on that on 15 minutes and give someone the bullet points.”

I started asking friends, I was like, “What do you think of this idea?” Everyone's like, “Well, no one is doing that, I kind of really like it.” So, the idea when it first started was literally just like, what was it called, cliff notes for other podcasts. That's it. So, I did that. I enjoyed that and then people started reaching out to me and they were like, “Hey, can we be on your podcast?” I was like, “Well.” So I did a few of those interviews and I really enjoyed those and that kind of transformed, so now I love doing interviews because it's just a different energy when there's two people or three people.

I still try and bring it back to the roots here and there of like other podcasts that I listen to and other stuff, but I just have this backlog of all these amazing interviews that I'm like, “Well, I really gotta get these out there.” It's kind of become a mix of both, but the feedback has been great, even on some of the interviews people tend to love those more. I like to do some solo stuff now which I wasn't doing in the beginning, just kind of like share my perspective, which the one that I did about upgrading your money conversation, for whatever reason, has just like tripled the download of anything else I've ever created.

Harry:
Was that the one where you had the car in the driveway?

Ilan:
That was right around that time. I did a different one where I was showing like the first check I got ever from like a previous job. That one has just downloaded like bananas. So, yeah, that's kind of how it transformed. I think you've probably noticed it's amazing when you have a podcast who will actually show up on to your show. They very rarely ask like, “How many downloads do you have?” and, “Who's your audience?” It's just good medium for people to share their stuff with.

Harry:
Yeah.

Ilan:
So, I mean, when I got Joe Navarro from What Every Body is Saying. I was like, “He…he…he said yes! He said he's going to be on my show!” I kept emailing him like, “Just confirming..Just reconfirming.” You know? Cuz he's like..

Guy:
*Laughter*.

Ilan:
Like the guy gets 50 grand to speak on stage, maybe even more, and he's like, “Yeah, I got 30 minutes open. Let's do it.” I was like, “Yes, awesome.”

Guy:
You know, it's a great medium for people just to be people without all the ego. That was probably my biggest surprise when Ilan started getting people who..he was like reading the book, doing the summery, and the next week the guy's like on the show. I'm like, “Has anybody said no yet?” and he's like, “No.”

Harry:
*Laughter*.

Guy:
I'm like, “Don't they ask you how many listeners you have?” He's like, “No.” I'm like, “This is amazing!” *Laughter*. So, I was like wow, there's really something to podcasting, so whether the impression out there about what this medium is that hasn't been mature enough that people really understand. I mean, I'm sure it's going to get harder and harder. Like, podcasting been around for a while, but like this was the year I saw like every marketer start a podcast. It's like, boom. It's exploding right now.

Harry:
A lot of people are calling it the John Lee Dumas effect, because he started in 2012, relatively unknown, but he did, he had a huge runaway, obviously, because he had saved a ton of money. He didn't really pick up steam until episode 60. He talks about it a lot if you got into detail on some of his interviews. So, it's not an overnight thing, but that point you're making about the ability to speak to people who wouldn't otherwise speak to you, I've touched upon it on earlier shows here, but I think it bares repeating; these are folks who get paid big money to speak, to consult for like an hour's worth of their time, and I think if you come at it at a compelling angle that you wanna hear their story, just a lot of times..you may even catch them off guard and be like, “Oh, someone who wants to hear my story, not someone who want's to pick my brain.” Which, we all know is code for I need free consulting.

Guy:
Yeah.

Ilan:
Yes.

Guy:
That's what ends up happening though. I mean, people give millions of dollars worth of information on podcasts. They really do. Like you said, if you find somebody, go back to the beginning, listen to the progression and growth, because you're going to understand how they built the perspective, which is ultimately what's going to power you is just modeling a perspective and taking that and turning it into your own. It's just amazing these guys who do get paid like $25,000 – $50,000 to share their wisdom over a 2 day period will just sit at an hour podcast and go blah blah blah, because that's what happens when we talk.

Harry:
Yeah, it sure puts them at ease and I think it makes them feel comfortable and they're probably calling from their homes, so they don't feel like..probably in the pajamas, who knows what they're doing, who knows what they're doing, but they're definitely feeling more comfortable.

So, Satori Prime. You guys have discussed it as your goal, your mission, is to break down the walls to what people believe is possible in their life. Do you feel like the podcast in conjunction with the one-on-one work you guys do with your clients is achieving that?

Ilan:
I mean, Guy could probably tell you better because he's just been like shocked by it. It's kind of have been…I have found for me it's just been the best medium. You know, I love making videos, but doing audios has actually made me better on video, I think I can attest to that. It just made me find my voice allowed me to speak clear. You know, listening back to your podcast over and over, edit them, listen to them, but the other day, Guy calls me and goes, “So, I dunno what has happened, but I just have to show you something really cool.” He shows me like the counter on our website and he goes, “Okay, so check out July.” We had, up until July, we had, what, 5-6,000 pretty much consistent every month?

Guy:
Around that, yeah. Like, organic clicks, yeah, to the website.

Ilan:
Then, literally from that month to August it jumped to 31,000.

Harry:
Wow.

Ilan:
So like six-tupled…Six-tupled? Is that even a word?

Guy:
Probably not, but we'll go with it.

Harry:
It works.

Ilan:
It's SEX-TUPLED.

Guy:
Sex is better, add sexy too it.

Harry:
It's always better with sex.

Ilan:
We were like, how, where, you know, we haven't done anything really with SEO and he was like, “The only explanation I can think of is the podcast.” You know.

Guy:
Yeah.

Ilan:
Like, driving so much, so much, so much traffic, eventually people all leading to this. So, I absolutely think it helps and like Guy said, the more mediums you can capture people in, you know, some people love to read, so you got the blog. Some people love to watch the videos, so we got the videos. Some people are very auditory and they just like listening to information, whether they're driving a car, they're working at their desk, whatever. I think not having it, you know, I can't really say it's like the best thing ever for our business. I mean, it's definitely has brought in tons of clients, but I think not having is very hurtful for your business just because your medium wheel that we were talking about.

Guy:
I think the ultimately the goal with any business, what is it? To be build relationships, earn trust, and because you have that right now to recommend something that's going to make a different to people, right, but what you need to earn is really their listening. Like, earning a person's listening is the most powerful thing you can earn. The president of the United States could stand in, you know, time square in a corner yelling the same shit he yells and people would be like, “Look at that psycho.” Right?

We change one distinction, we say president, and everybody's just like boop, ears open, let's start listening. So, you have to earn that, which you can lose it as well. It's really powerful, but I think if anything what it's done is expanded our listener base. I don't know if we can easily track..In terms of value we can, be like, “Oh, well we did this and our return on our investment is here, so let's keep doing more of that.” It's tough to track in that way, but again, our listener base; before we were kind of known as, internally, we're known as really good Facebook marketers. We're also very good personal development teachers.

The irony of the whole thing is, for us, our passion is all in personal development. Like, if I had to do something right now where I was like this is what I'm going to do for the rest of my life, I'd be like a Gandhi, Like, 100 million people need to transform right now, global transformation movement, the world is burning, everyone needs to wake the fuck up, stop pretending. That's what I'd be about.

Harry:
Yeah.

Ilan:
Yeah.

Guy:
I'd be preferred to be known as that, plus I'm a good marketer on the side. So, right now we're kind of pivoting how we wanna be seen. I don't think we had the confidence. We didn't feel like we have earned the value to tell people, like, by the way, we're really fucking good at this shit. Like, you can come talk to me and within an hour you're going to be thinking different about your life, the actions to take, the role as a human being on this planet and what's possible for you.

That's what I'm excited about. You're going to see a big transition. Within this year, I don't know, we start getting to a million download like we get an episode, imagine that. That is…Damn. I could make an episode and a million people get impacted, I'm going to start doing some really transformation stuff with people. *Laughter*. I'm going to be like, build the stage, prop it up, because I'm ready to share some really good stuff with people. *Laughter*.

Harry:
That type of talk really charges me up, man. That shit is amazing. I get goose bumps when I hear that stuff. I just love..I'm the type of person that believes, like, tunes into people's frequencies, the energy of the university, and you have to create this positive, positive vibe, because it's what you're going to get back ten fold and you have to get give without receiving and you have to find ways to make people's lives better either through education or through your show or through networking.

I've kind of been ramping up big time on the power of networking and the power of introducing like minded people together so they can work and when you see that happen you're like, “Oh shit, that's amazing.” Two disconnected people met and now they're working on this project together. That's fantastic shit. I love when that shit happens.

Guy:
I think that's why you feel it. I have goose bumps too. It's that recognition in yourself that like, we're just talking about it, people are like, “How do I change the world? How do I impact it?” You know, it's funny, I don't know if I've said it until this last hour, live your passion. If there's anything that I could tell you, human being, you wanna change this planet? Live your passion, because when you do that, you're going to do that at the highest level. You're going to make a difference for other people and passion is infectious.

Like, when you hear someone's passionate you're like, “Holy fuck, I really gotta get my ass in gear. I have to do what I'm suppose to be doing. This commute is killing my fucking life.” So, it's like just share your passion. We were just saying, if you like crayons, be the best at drawing crayons and like, then share that crazy with them. Like, I love that honeymoon red.

Harry:
Handmade crayons. Make your own crayon company.

Guy:
Make your own crayons, I don't care what you do, but like if someone's passionate about science or someone's about, we were just talking urban agriculture, like your passion is going to change the world. Again, if I get to share my passion and just like boom, and a million people are like, “Fuck, I can spend an hour doing something different today.” For me, that's how we're going to change the world.

Harry:
You can take two people with the exact same skill set and education and one has the passion and the other doesn't and the one that you're going to listen to, the one you're going to vibe, the one that's going to connect to the most amount of people exponentially is going to be the one who has the excitement in their voice and the passion with how they deliver it.

Ilan:
Well, the one without passion will always fade away because, for them, it's work. The one that's passionate, there's no work involved. When people ask Guy and I how we built our business, I was like, “Well, we worked for 12-16 hours a day for, you know, two and half years before we even knew who the hell we were.” They're like, “Oh my god, that's crazy.” I'm like, “Yeah, but it really didn't feel like work.” I tell people, you know, if I didn't have a wife and kids, I think I'd probably be in front of my computer for 20 hours a day. I just love what we do. I love reaching out to people.

You know, you asked before, why podcast, one of the things we started realizing is we were kind of getting niched down as Facebook, marketing experts, and I was like, “Bro, we're so much more than that.” But, we couldn't even post blog posts about that because all of our people came to our blog to find out about Facebook.

Guy:
Very true.

Ilan:
Building a business and I was like, “Ahhh.” Mean while I'm learning about being a better father, health and fitness, personal development, all this other stuff and I was just like, I feel like people need to know this stuff. So, that was a big catalyst for the podcast too. It was like, it would give us this opening to reach people about all this other stuff and you found us on Ari's podcast, which is a productivity podcast, right.

Harry:
Yep.

Ilan:
We've been, we've had like things like you've heard with Happy Corner and Stella, which is totally raw and personal development. All over the map. That excites me because I'm passionate about learning that stuff. Now I have an avenue to actually express that passion of people.

Harry:
Yeah, when you talk about doing your passion. The way you describe it on the show, when you worked for 4-5 hours and it feels like 5 minutes, that's when you know you're doing the right time.

Guy:
Yep, time dilation. Absolutely

Harry:
So, one of the things that's fantastic..actually, what we might wanna do for the listeners is talk a little bit about what Satori Prime is and the mission whether it's changed from where you started and the type of the things that you're working on now.. Guy's laughing as I say this.

Guy:
I'm laughing because I'm always like how do I begin to answer that? Like, every time somebody asks me that, I'm like, which of the hundred and 50 things that Satori Prime stands for do I start with?

Harry:
Let's start with the name.

Guy:
Okay, I like it when you share the story because I always fuck it somehow and you end up correcting it anyway, so I'm like, ahh just tell the story. *Laughter*.

Harry:
*Laughter*. That's sweet.

Ilan:
*Laughter*. Satori Prime. Well, they can't see it on video, but it's right up there behind me on the lights. Not on the lights, it's actually a decal. Anyway, Satori Prime, we were looking for a name for the company when we kind of first merged. Ferdman, which is our last name, is horrible, so we didn't want to be The Fermans.

Guy:
*Laughter*.

Ilan:
No offense, dad. The brothers, you know, which we kind of like been called for a long time where ever we went we were like, “The Brothers” but it's so generic that I don't think it'll go anywhere, so we were like we needed a name. We didn't want to work with Ilan and Guy, because that's just long a boring.

Guy:
*Laughter*.

Ilan:
So, Satori is a name I came across in a book a long time ago and in commercial real estate, I actually had two hedge funds and they were both called Satori Capital and Satori Investment Capital, so it was a name that I really loved. I kind of felt bad using it, but we kept, right, Guy? We kept coming back to that name.

Guy:
Yep, I love it.

Ilan:
It means a moment of enlightenment. We're like, we're all about waking people up, we're all about breaking down the walls of what people are possible. It just has a cool sound. It has an amazing name. Everyone asked, even back in the day like, “What does Satori mean?” So, it was a good conversation started. We needed another thing. We had just saw Transformers.

Guy:
*Laughter*.

Ilan:
This is no joke, we had just saw Transformers, loved Optimus Prime as a kid. We just said, Satori Prime thinking like prime as the best, right. We put it together and we're like, “That has a really cool ring to it. Like, it just rolls off the tongue, it's nice, and 3-4 months after, someone asked me that question and I said, “You know what? I've never actually looked up the definition of prime.”

So I literally go into Google and I type in prime and the definition is, a moment of greatest strength, vigor, or financial success in your life and I just stopped there and I went, “You gotta be fucking kidding me.” *Laughter*. So, Satori Prime, literally means, and this is one of those things I'm such a believer in there are no accidents, what balls to name our company that like, our mission is to impact 100 million people, what balls to name it Satori Prime, a moment of enlightenment to your moment of greatest strength, vigor, financial success. I was like..

Harry:
Done, done.

Ilan:
It was the most amazing thing, this is good, but now we gotta actually live up to it and actually..

Guy:
Deliver on that.

Ilan:
But you know what, it's a perfect example of what happens when you're living passionately. It's like, I really no longer believe that the world is happening to you, I think it's happening for you. Education, your perspective, the empowerment that you personally feel. So, we always talk about power, freedom, and full self-expression. Like, humans gotta have that, like a human with out purpose is like a human with one foot in the grave. You're not living. You're waiting for your turn to die. You're just waiting for your time. What are you doing with your time here? Most people are unfortunately living their life that way. I'm not okay with that.

What ever happens with the planet whether we're doing it, we're not doing it, I'm not certain, I have my opinions on it, but whatever, I'm not certain what's happening, but I do know how I feel watching people wake up and I do know how I feel seeing people be passionate about something. It's more of the reflection of how I feel about it when I'm doing it and seeing other people. Like, you said you got goose bumps, fuck, I got goose bumps too, because you got goose bumps, right! It's like this constant dance with each other. We're basically like one entity that's been fragmented into 7 billion different possibilities, but at the core of all of us is the same exact thing.

I don't care to share this anymore, honestly, like, I've been spending a lot of time with a shaman this last year doing like ayahuasca ceremonies, I mean, plant medicine making a comeback. I'm telling you, what you see in there, if you guys think what's happening out here has anything to do with who we are as beings. Pssh, it's not even fucking close.

Harry:
*Laughter*.

Guy:
Once you have one of these experiences. I took a break from it for like 10 months, but I just went last Friday to go do another ceremony. It'll change your life. You just..we don't even know what this fucking meat suit has done to us in terms of not giving us the ability to really express what we're here to express, so I'm like done with it. Right. It's so funny, in May I made a mental shift, like, in terms of my inner doubt. I think that's all it is, right. You believe stuff, but it's about shutting doubt and when you start doubt, the world is like, “Alright, let's accelerate this then.” And then it's the next thing that brings up doubt and you gotta shut that down and something switched over.

I won't even talk about what it was, but it just switched and our income started going boom, boom, boom. At the same time, I kept having these visions of giving these extremely passionate speeches to 100 million people, like on YouTube, broadcasting, I was like, “Alright.” All this time I've been wondering what's the cause, like what would the university want to give me money. Right? You gotta kind of figure that out. You're a channel for something whether it's good or bad, you're a channel for something.

I'm like, well if this is going to give me a shitload of money, I'm going to broadcast this stuff, right. I'm going to start broadcasting these messages. I don't need to travel all over the world, it's right here, this is the world in my bedroom. I'm going crazy. You know. So, I really think that's part of the function where it's showing up. It's not just to take care of us, it's because the world's like, “This kid's got something to share.” I'm ready to do that.

It's interesting to see which people are starting to get into our lives that are like quantum physicists, I know this sounds like crazy, but people in quantum physicists, people who are like ancient alien theorists, a lot of different things are coming into my life right now and what I'm seeing is everybody's missing marketing. They already know what's going on and the pieces are being put together, but no body knows how to package it together to make it particular and if there's anything I can tell you that I'm gifted at, at least what I think I'm gifted at, is taking very complex concepts, making them extremely particular and being like, “Here you go, buddy.” You're five years old, I can still explain it to you and you can use. I think that's what I'm here for, is to take all of this noise, package it, and deliver it to the human races, so we'll see if I can do that.

Ilan:
I guess that's Satori Prime.

Harry:
*Laughter*.

Guy:
*Laughter*.

Ilan:
I don't know what story is better, but that's Satori Prime.

Harry:
Holy shit, that was like, that was basically a download. That was a mind transmission and I understand the ayahuasca because I've been there as well. I understand what you're talking about when you're on that level and it's like, we're brothers from another mother, something like that. The whole concept of like being from the whole, in the world, the whole I'm you, you're me, we're all the same, what I do affects you. Like, if I do it in a negative way at the end of the day it'll affect me negatively as well.

It may not happen immediately, it's karma related, but you have to put out what you wanna receive, and you have to treat others, you have to have universal love for everything and everybody. You can have universal love in your messages, universal love in your actions, because if you love other people, at the end of the day you end up loving yourself.

Ilan:
I'll correct you, you can only love other people once you love yourself.

Harry:
Yep.

Ilan:
You can not provide someone something that's not inside of you. Wayne Dyer has the best analogy for this, he's like, “If you squeeze and orange, what are you going to get? You can't get pineapple juice, you can't get prune juice. It doesn't matter what you squeeze it with and how hard you squeeze it, all you can get is orange juice.” So, likewise with human beings, the only thing we can see in others is what see ourselves. I said to someone the other day and it never occurred to me this way, but it's like, imagine if you never, I mean, this can not happen, but imagine for a second, if you never got angry. Like, you've never experienced anger. You wouldn't even be able to see anger in another person, because it wasn't real to you. I was like, “Damn, that would be a cool concept.” I mean, we all experience that, but for example, what's something I can give you that's really potable. Like, for a father, from a new father, okay..do you have any kids, Harry?

Harry:
No kids.

Ilan:
Okay, so Guy doesn't either minus for his cats.

Harry:
*Laughter*.

Guy:
I have two cats.

Harry:
I got a yorkie.

Ilan:
There you go.

Guy:
*Laughter*.

Ilan:
When I have an interaction with my kid and you see that interaction with my kid, you don't have inside of you the ability to have that interaction. Like, you can envision it with your eyes with your dad or whatever, but like, till you have that experience, it's impossible to experience father until you're a father like in that realm and whatever that would be, so it's like, when you see that universal love, you see that in others and you're all about, that's because that's inside of you. You've unleashed that thing. Think about how many people that you've met around the world that have no conscious ability or awareness that even exists and t hey shit on people like they're walking on top of them on their way to whatever;.

Harry:
Yeah.

Ilan:
I'm very happy that you're in that space with us.

Guy:
That space, yeah.

Harry:
I believe in intention and putting intention out in the universe. You have to actively to communicate to the universe if you want shit happen. You have to say what it is that you want and you have to be able to articulate what you want, because if you just say, “I want money.” Then what you're communicating to the universe that you have a lack of and you need of. So, you have to be careful in the communication and the intention and one of the things right now, to be quite honest, is that I'm intending like this is the jumping off point for my podcast, because you just took this shit to another level.

Ilan/Guy:
*Laughter*.

Harry:
And this podcast, let it be known from this episode forward, is just going to be operating on some other level type shit, so…

Ilan:
Brilliant.

Harry:
And this vibe and this energy is just going to permeate through future, because that's how the universe works, it's going to permeate through future guests. So, the echos are going to live on. I just wanna put that out there to say that.

Ilan:
I love that. That was so brilliantly said.

Guy:
I mean, so, what is Satori Prime, I'm telling you, right now when I see that is that we are a leadership academy, because I love this example, I keep saying it more and more, you know the Matrix right?

Harry:
Yeah.

Guy:
You've seen the Matrix. Your eyes lit up means you like it a lot. So, remember the first one, she takes him to see the oracle for the first time and he's staying there one boy is bouncing the cubes another one bending the spoon, the famous spoon there, and he walks in there and she's sitting down and there's a sign above his head and she's like, “Do you know what that means?” And he's like, “No.” She goes, “It means Know Thy Self.” So, she looks at him and she says, “Being the one is not something anybody can tell you. It's a lot like being love, you just know you are. You walk like you are.” It's just like a self-recognition, right? So, I start having this idea of like, years ago, that I could be the one, but it seems so ridiculous to me, because I'm like, what are the chances? What lottery do I have to win to be the one? I'm like, the one usually dies young, there's a lot of shit..

Ilan:
*Laughter*.

Guy:
I'm like, there's a lot of scary shit to be the one too. But, I'm like, you know what? Honestly, I kept having this experience where I'm like being the one. This whole thing where I'm giving a speech where I'm talking to like millions of people all over the world. So, it occurred to me when he's like in that room with those kids, they're all the one.

She's just looking for one of them to say, “I am the one.” Like, to recognize that you have it, right. So, I started looking at all of this and realized when I was in those ceremonies, we have all these six sensory perception that we're not using. Telepathy, ability to heal each other, all these things that you experience when you're on aya, and I'm like, fuck, we got this shit on all the time, which means everyone of us is a potential to one. People like Gandhi and Martin Luther King were just people who were like, “I will be.” Like, I'm recognizing that I am, so like, I'll be responsible for my people. I'll responsible for this country. What we need is like, I'll be responsible for this world, but ultimately being the one to me doesn't mean I am the one that has to do it. It's the…when people see somebody being the one, just like when people seeing being somebody wake up, what do they do? Poof, they wake up too. People see passion.

What do they want? They want to be passionate. When people see leadership, what do they want? They want to be leaders. If there's anything that I've learned is leadership starts with another leader taping you and going, “You have this too.” I learned this because we used to coach this program called self-expression leadership program and there used to about a 100 people in the room. In my childhood I was really depressed, anger, suicidal for many years. So, I'd always look for the most fucked up person in the room, but like give me your huddle masses, give me your poor, like..

Ilan:
*Laughter*.

Guy:
Like, you're super fucked up, come work with me because I've been there. I'll pull you out of the trenches, but what I saw was like, there's so much effort to get someone out of that space that it just kills you, right. It takes all your energy. So, I was in this one class, I had developed this ability to see like early onset leadership. Like, you know, people would see early onset diabetes, but the opposite way around. Like, I can notice these traits in people and I'm like, “Holy fuck, you're like a few steps away from banging shit out in this world.” So, I would walk up to these people and be like, “I just want you to know. I can see something that I saw in myself a few years ago in you, I mean, you have wild potential to be a leader, like, insane amounts.”

We would develop this conversation over four months and over four months I'd see them own it and then they're just impacting people everywhere, but what would be beautiful is that out of the room of a 100 people, I would grab 4-5 maybe that I could see really have this quality and the other 100 would be taken care of a function of these 4-5 recognizing leadership, but that pyramid effect, right. No, marketing company and that's what I see now, so what is being the one? It's just representing that idea so that other people can recognize it to where we're all the one, but which one of us is finally going to stand up and be like, “These political assholes, they're not going to fix nothing. What are we waiting for? Let's have a conversation.” They have no power unless it's the power we give them.

Harry:
Yeah.

Guy:
So if tomorrow we all stand up and say that's not what we're focusing on anymore. Obama, sorry, you lost our listening or whatever, here is where the listening is now. We can easily do that through an app. We create like a focus app where once a day we're like, by the way, for 5 minutes everybody focus on healing the planet. You don't think that's going to heal the planet? That much power?

Harry:
Totally.

Ilan:
Trademarked. It's already in the works, kids.

Guy:
Exactly. Here's my point is, for me, that's what it's going to take for global movement. Let's recognize that we're the one, let's recognize we have leadership ability, find maybe people further along the path than not, let's start focusing on what's important, and it's sure as fuck not what's happening in the world right now. So, I don't know what else that looks like, but that's this is going, that's where this ship is sailing.

Harry:
It's funny because…like, if this was in person I'd probably be quiet for a couple of minutes to just absorb, like, everything you're saying right now, because it's a lot, it's a lot what you're saying and you can't just be like, “Oh, okay.”

Guy:
It's scary as hell to say it, trust me.

Harry:
Yeah, it's crazy. It's like, oh, you know, you move from there into here, like, what's your favorite ice cream? You just can't..

Guy:
*Laughter*. Chocolate peanut butter.

Harry:
You have to be like, no, did you not acknowledge what I just said? Can you allow that for it to sink in for at least 10-15 fucking seconds. Like, absorb what you just heard and decide whether you vibe with it or you don't and have an opinion on it and then decide what you want to take from it, what you want to pull out from it to use in your life going forward. The great thing about it is that this episode is recorded and people can play it back as many times as they want.

Guy:
Hopefully 30 years from now we're playing it back and going, “Holy shit, that really happened.”

Harry:
Yeah. I just love you guys have these huge, huge aspirations. I don't know if it was a 100 million when you started, but by 2020, I think it was a million, right?

Guy:
It was. I think after that experience I said throw two more zeros on that bitch.

Ilan:
Guy opt it. So, we're doing this like really amazing, we were working with this entrepreneur community, there was this really nice event. I'm sharing with people our story, Satori Prime, and I said a million and Guy was like, “By the way, just letting you know, I upped it to a 100.” I was like, “You could have consulted me!” *Laughter*.

Guy:
*Laughter*.

Harry:
That's perfect man, I'm going to mesh my group with some folks that are doing some of the same things, but funny, there are a couple of people in the group that were kind of on this vibe and they were like, we're playing small here. Like, we're thinking about put out an Amazon kindle book or something like that, they were like, no, fuck that. I want to be a published book through the traditional channels and, not only that, have it go to like number 1 New York Times bestseller like really put yourself up. The universe is going to give you that which you thinks you can handle and if you're putting out this vibe, “Oh, I think I can put out a 99 cent pamphlet and hopefully I can get like a 100 downloads.” Well, boom, you got it. You can have that next week.

Guy:
You're going to get it.

Ilan:
People are going to give you 99 cents of their attention.

Harry:
Yeah, but if you say, no, I want the fucking..like Tim Ferriss can be New York Times bestseller, like, boom that's the sound of the book hitting your desk when it comes in the mail, because that's mine because I did that. That's playing big and getting into that mentality where you can feel like you can play in the same stadium these other folks are playing.

Guy:
You know, it's interesting, like you're talking about publishing a book and doing that, you know, if you notice our goal is like impact 100 million people, break down the walls to what we see possible, what they believe is possible for themselves. That's kind of like always been the vision. How that gets done, honestly, has shifted about 1,001 different ways. If you asked us 3 years ago when we started, like, would we like to be known as Facebook experts across the entire interweb and have people reach out to us and have some of the biggest marketing guys reach out to us and launch their products we'd be like, “What the fuck do we know about Facebook marketing?” Right? Here we are. That's what we're doing. That's now what's become our self-expression.

Now, we could have resisted that and be like, “No, no, no. We're impacting a million people and waking them up and I don't see how that works with that.” Then, we'd miss this massive opportunity. The universe has a funny way of showing you where you need to be at what time. Most people are no to everything that doesn't fit. They do that like walk, you guys can't see me on video, but they walk like horse in New York City with like blinders on and if it doesn't fit within their perfect jigsaw puzzle, then they're like, “No, this isn't it. This isn't it.”

Right? So, when I hear someone be like, “I wanna be a New York Time bestseller.” I'm all for it, but that's a function of who you want to be. Who you wanna be and the impact you wanna cause in the world that should always be the driving force, because if you don't become number 1 bestseller, what will most likely happen is you're going to run with your fucking tail between your legs and go, “I didn't get the top seller. My book only made it into 15.”

Ilan:
*Laughter*.

Guy:
Instead of being like, fuck, I sold whatever, you know, and I'm still fulfilling your mission. I don't care how you fulfill your mission. If your mission is..whatever. Just to use a ridiculous example, to share the beauty of crayons with people, then who gives a shit of what the little things along the way are, make that your mission and don't stop till that is realized in the world or die trying and then who cares?

Harry/Ilan:
Yeah.

Guy:
Crayola didn't buy your magical crayons, but you know what? I bet along that way millions of people became passionate about crayons. So, did you fail? Fuck no. You woke a million people up about the beauty of crayons.

Ilan:
You created a result, maybe not the exact one you had in your mind. I want to give a quick analogy, what I think we're finding out more and more is that the farther we can project, the farther we can see down the road. So like, people believe who they are in the present moment is a function of their past, which is one of the biggest lies of humanity today. Who you are in the present moment is the function of the future that you're expecting.

So, if you're driving a car at night time, like, what do you do? You have your headlights, they may be 50 feet out and you just trust that the road is going to keep revealing itself in front of you. That's honestly how you wanna move through life, at least how I see it through. Just keep your foot on the gas. The action leads to the next action.

Otherwise, imagine you can only see 50 feet at night and you're like brake, okay, let me work myself back up again, it's pretty scary out there, and then you're like, I'll move 5 more feet and then break. Imagine that's how people live their life, right. So, if the headlights are only 10 feet in front of you, you're not going to drive very fast. Now, imagine those headlights, you could see a mile down the road, you could drive way, way faster. There's much more velocity in life.

So, with that idea in mind it's like, now, how far in your life can you project forward. Now, this thing, our little brains over here, these are super computers. There's not a computer on the planet that can process anything that is close to as here. You guys wanna try some fun things with yourself? Ask yourself really important questions right before you go to bed. Let your subconscious mind go on it during REM state, go to work, you're waking up with some answers. So, let the program do what it knows how to do.

With that idea in mind is like, fine, we can do a million people by 2020 and even that to me is like, holy fuck, holy fuck. Like, it seems pretty unreasonable, but like if I have a super computer in my meat bag, right, I'm like, I might as well go to the meat bag and go, “Hey, by the way, you know that thing we're working on? Look for a solution for 100 million people. Forget the million.”

Harry:
Yeah.

Ilan:
I might as well at least live with that. I was thinking to myself, given the last aya ceremony, I was like, I've been popping out of my body having these future premenisions and the timeline seems to keep catching up to it. I'm like, eh, let's sure this thing out in 3,000 years. Forget 10 years, forget 50 years, let's just project what could possibly could happen 3,000 years into the future. If we do that, the choices we are making today are in line with the future that I'm expecting 3,000 years down the line. Like, let's stop being so short sighted. Let's start looking at who we are as a species. We were are in this fucking universe. Like, we're fucking retarded. We're so dumb it's not even funny. The best thing you can do for yourself is not know that you know something is to start learning stuff that you realize how little you freaking now.

Harry/Guy:
Yea.

Ilan:
So, you can start having these wild feats of fancy about imagine, because you have been lend to believe is knowing something is somehow cool or empowers you. That's not true. Knowing nothing empowers you, that's why kids can have overwhelmed beautiful imaginations that allow them to become who they want when they want to become them, because they know nothing. They walk around with that concept. So, get back there. Get back there whatever it takes to get back there. It takes me back there. I'm like, I know nothing when I am in that state. It's crazy.

Harry:
Yeah, it's all about remembering and taking these two different words the re and the member and bring ourselves back into whole, because that's what happens, we forget. The beauty of kids, the innocence of kids, the creativity of kids is just a magical thing to watch. I'm sure you're experiencing that first-hand and you almost want to freeze that and put them in this sort of like time capsule and be like, don't lose that, don't lose that innocence; don't lose that creativity, don't lose that love for life that universal love for everything you see and touch and everything you see and touch and the beauty in everything you see just the innocence, like, don't lose that.

How do you do that? That's probably one of the biggest challenges.

Ilan:
That's my new life plan is figuring out how to do that. It's interesting, my kid is really defiant is kind of the word that they've dubbed him at school, but he just from a very early age knew exactly what he wanted. He didn't even know the language, but he knew that if I tried to put blue sneakers on him when he wanted black sneakers on him, blue sneakers were not going on him. It was just not happening and he was like 12 months old, 14 months old.

I know that quality is the most powerful thing that a human being can have. This innate drive to not settle for anything other than what you want. You know, if I could go around giving that to people, it'll be like, you got it, you got it, like, how much cooler would the world be? No one settling for people, jobs, anything, food, *Laughter*, clothes, it doesn't even matter, they just wouldn't settle. Now, the problem is that there's this society and he's going to school now and there's like certain ways that school needs you to be in order for you to function inside of that environment, right?

Guy:
Compliance.

Ilan:
So, now we're in this delicate balance of I have this genius that all I would love to do is just grow it and let him out into the world and just be this amazing, amazing leader, right, like what we were talking about and then there's this whole other side is like, well, I would love for you to do that and you need to function within some sort of confines of what schooling is, because if you're being a brat and a dick and they keep throwing you out of school, which they haven't, but I'm saying like if that eventually ends up happening, then, then what?

So, again, it's always finding that equilibrium. So, even me as a dad, I'm trying to find what is that balance. How do I still instill in him and let him have that imagination and creativity and that beauty that a kid has and sit give him a little bit of constraint where, you know…people just beat their kids into this mold that they think they need them to be versus allowing these kids to flower into what they want them to be. Again, you're fighting that balance. That's just what I'm dealing with right now and I got to tell you, it's not easy. *Laughter*. It's not easy.

Guy:
That's it, man. We're just going to take out that educational system and it'll be fine.

Harry:
*Laughter*. Are you looking at the Montessori schools and that whole school of anthropomorphic thought?

Ilan:
Yes, absolutely. We are actually consulting with a Montessori teacher as these events happen our kid is insanely… I'll give you a perfect example, so one of the things they teach kids is you wanna develop them choosing early on, the power of choice, to the point where you allow your kid to choose something and if there's a consequence that you even know like, if they're going to do this, they're going to be some horrible consequences, you have to let them experience that, which is an amazing thing, right.

So, we doing this with Shia and after like a week, he catches on that when you're giving him choices, you're still like, within a parameter, you're allowing him to be independent, but at the time you're making choices, right. So kind of like boxing his choices in, so, no joke, less than a week, he goes to my wife, he goes, “No more choices. I'm going to give you a choice.” *Laughter*.I was like, “Damn, he caught on fast.” *Laughter*.

They're incredible.

Guy:
Yeah, I mean, I was just sitting here and this is not the first time this idea has popped up outta my mouth, but I would love to develop children think tanks. Like, we put all these smart people in a room, but they're bound by their education, they're bound by..I'll give you an example, in our business, I'm the technically guy. So, I've built all the websites by stuff, all the technical stuff, Ilan is way more on the relationships side.

When Ilan first got into the business, he doesn't know anything. He's not bound by the technical build of what you can build and what you can't build. He's just throwing out fucking crazy ideas left and right and center and I'm like sitting there, like, fuming with him because I'm like..To him, that's 3 seconds out of his mouth and he's like ahhhhh bada budaa, but for me it's like 3 months sitting in front of a computer trying to figure out how to develop that idea into something practical and real. You know, do you know how much work you just gave me?

Like that stupid 3 seconds of your mouth, but it's actually what has helped us grow our business at an extremely high rate because he wasn't bound by the same parameters my mind was bound, so it's kind of the same thing. I would love to put kids into a think tank and be like, here's a global problem and get kids answers from it, because they won't be bound by the reality an adult is.

Ilan:
They might actually come up with some cool shit.

Guy:
No, it's incredible and if you've ever read those things where like kids give answers to adult problems, it's always like, oh my god, I'd have never thought of that.

Harry:
Talk a little bit about your opinions on college. I know you guys have touched upon that on one of the episodes.

Ilan:
*Laughter*. Another brutal topic in the Ferdman household. It's funny, I was listening on my way to drop off the kids, what like yesterday? A radio station actually had the exact conversation and here's what's funny – they were asking people what they went to study at school and what their actual careers were.

So, I'm just gonna kind of like from what I remember, but here were the top three. One guy went to study history, he now drives a truck for a living. Another guy went to study finance and communication, carpenter. One person went to school, but was unemployed and they're all still preaching about the value of school and I'm like, “Are you fucking listening to what you just said?” And then one guy finally got and he, you know, went to school, got a career, but he's like, “Look, I've never done anything in my life where I've showed up and what I studied in school has made any difference in my work.” In other words, “Once I started a job, they taught how to do that job.” He goes,”I don't understand why we can't go back to the way things were where there were it was an apprenticeships style.” It's like, you know what, I love this, I'm passionate about this, I'm going to go study with that guy.

This book that you probably heard me talk about on my podcast Robert Greene's Mastery talks exactly about this. It's like spend 7 years learning from someone is a master at something, you're going to be damn good at it, and then your creativity and your thought processes and your imagination is going to take what he knows, package it with everything your brain works, and just take it to the moon. So like, you can do that.

I guarantee you there's not a person on the planet that you could pay $100,000 to take an 18 year old kid today and work with them for 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 years. I almost guarantee it because, as a master, if I knew someone else was passionate about that thing and you know, I knew he was going to play balls to the wall and I knew there was time and a money commitment behind it, I'd spend my time doing that.

Basically the only thing that I can understand as an argument for college is the fact that the experience is amazing. My four year of the University of Rochester were amazing. Did I learn much? Uhh. I didn't learn anything academically, I'll say that. I did learn about myself, you know, I learned how to drink, I learned how to experiment with certain drugs..

Harry:
*Laughter*.

Guy:
Which is kind of important in life. *Laughter*.

Ilan:
I got to travel, like, I got to live abroad in Spain and I will say that hands-down that 5-6 months of my life was the most educational personally. Like, I learned about myself, I learned about other people, culture, it opened my mind. I would rather give my kid $25,000 as a start up money, go to Europe, get a job, and enjoy Europe, like travel around Europe finding odd end jobs. You'll learn more in a year doing that than you would, in my opinion, in a university.

Harry:
So is that's what's in your works for your kid then?

Ilan:
Well, that's the part. We're talking about balance, right. So my wife still got to send him to school. This is everyone's argument, it's like, “What's the back up plan?” I'm like, “What fucking backup plan has a degree ever bought you?” Like, I just don't see..Okay, so…

Guy:
It's just really good marketing. Universities, colleges, I mean, it's a good marketing machine. I'm sorry cut you off, but I was watching..I get more news from like Daily Show and those kinds of shows, like Bill Maher and stuff, but honestly that's like more real than the real news, honestly, because it gives you perspective on something in a provocative way. They were showing statistics of like colleges like ITC Tech and these like for-profit colleges essentially. It's disturbing. It really is disturbing and it's becoming like just churn and burn. I mean, I look at college as really good marketing. They use fear tactics.

I mean, like right now looking at language marketing, what they do is they use fear tactics that they tell you, they show you statistics on how much more a person earns over a lifetime that doesn't. Granted, when you talk to them about the blue-collar space, the white-collar space, if you want to be a worker bee, go to college.

You're going to make more money doing that, without a doubt. It's going to open the door for you. It doesn't guarantee shit though and, honestly, I have never used my education. I can't think of one moment where I'm like, “It's good I learned that.”I mean, besides like 5th grade math, not even, 3rd grade month, which is what we still use today. I'm like, I dunno why I need anything else.

Harry:
*Laughter*.

Guy:
The only other exceptions I can think of is doctors, right, like if you really wanna understand you want to specialize in something, yeah, I don't want a doctor who's been in school for three years.

Harry:
Yeah, you probably want an educated doctor.

Guy:
Exactly, again, I had a friend who wanted to be a pediatrician after he went through business school at Boston College. This kid graduated with honors, went to business, didn't like, left there; remembered at 7 years old he wanted to be in pediatrics, went to medical school, starts craving up bodies, looks at the coding for insurance companies, because they've coded everything, so you know how much money you can earn potentially how insurance companies coded stuff, had to take out a quarter of a million dollar loan, because his parents would never pay it off by themselves; realized not in a bazillion years could he be a pediatrician that could pay off that loan, and then became a, what's it called…Say it again?

Ilan:
Podiatrist, a foot doctor.

Guy:
No, no, no. The person that puts you under.

Ilan:
Oh, anesthesiologist.

Guy:
Not because he's passionate about it, but he cause it's going to pay off the loan. So, even the thing he thought he was passionate about he couldn't even go do it. I'm like, what kind of a fucked up system do we live in that that's what happening. So like, for me, here's how I see education changing. Number 1, spiritual education, mediation, life education. Like, here's what you’re going to do, stop lying to the child that at 18 you come out and there's like roses blooming out of your ass.

Ilan:
*Laughter*.

Guy:
Life is hard and it's going to be challenging. Like, understand things don't come easy like they do on an iPhone. Teach the stuff to people. At 12-13 years old, every kid should have a business.

Harry:
Yeah.

Guy:
Whatever you like. You like making soap? Make soap. You like taking a shit over here, try and turn that into a business. I don't care what you do, just try and sell it to somebody, because you learn communication skills, you learn persuasion, you learn how to interact with people. inspire people.

Harry:
Yeah.

Guy:
You learn the things that actually matter when you get into the world and you talk to somebody. You gain confidence talking to women, whatever the fuck it is, right, just get into a situation that forces people into failure as soon and as quickly as possible, so that they get really comfortable with that happening to them and it's not like, “I'm bad.” You know, “I'm a bad little boy.” That crap needs to stop.

Ilan:
There's a girl that, I don't know if you listen, there's a podcast run by like a 13 year old who interviews other entrepreneurial teenagers, like, young kids.

Harry :
I know there's one called…man, I was literally thinking about this as I was saying so it's funny we're like..It's one..I actually interviewed him. His name is Jordan Agolli. He's a teenage entrepreneur, but he's 20 now. He was 19 and now he's 20. So I don't know if there's somebody even younger doing it.

Ilan:
This younger. She interviews like 12 year olds or he interviews 12 and 13 year olds. So, this one girl that you were talking about, like, you know, you shit somewhere and you pick it up. This girl, her parents started asking her questions like, “How do you think you can help the world? How do you think you can serve your community.” Like, things like that and had her start pitching ideas.

Guy:
Smart.

Ilan:
She realized people walk their dogs and crap is left on the streets and stuff like that so she offered to go around and they made her go and knock on people's doors and she built a business around going around her community and picking up like dirt and shit and all that stuff, she started making like a $1,000 a week just within a few blocks and she was 12 years old. I was like..

Guy:
It's like a million dollars those 12 year olds.

Ilan:
I was like that will outweigh any college education that any kid is ever going to get.

Guy:
Absolutely.

Ilan:
This is my idea, this is what I”m trying to pitch to my wife just to kind of put a bow on this whole thing. I would rather give my kid, say by the time my older kid is going to college, presumably it'll be like $100,000 a year. NYU, my friend just put their kid in NYU, is $66,000 a year.

Harry:
*Laughter*.

Ilan:
That's not including her going out and drinking in New York City and having to buy the million other things she needs to buy. $66. I was like Blurh? So, let's assume $100,000 a year.

Harry:
That was your best Scooby Doo, right?

Ilan/Guy:
*Laughter*.

Ilan:
I rather give my kid a $100,000. Well, the plan would be like this. You come to me with a business idea, investment idea, a business idea, something. I will give you a $100,000. You spend all year trying to make that $100,000, create some sort of revenue for yourself. You know what? I know the first two, he's going to lose every single penny.

I know, but on the 3rd one or the 4th one, that kid will be a millionaire or a very, very successful..he will have started a very successful business. That might not be his last business, but that's what Guy is saying, through that failure in a very concentrated fast area, like, you're going to get some really good life lessons, some really good business lessons, that's what's people need and if I can finance that, I'd be more than happy to finance that.

Guy:
Yeah, by far in large the most interesting people I meet today are the ones that are homeschooled and started businesses when they were young. It's a completely different quality of person and then I look at everyone who's gone to school and I'm like, you have zero ability to critically think, you watch the news, you repeat the same three worded buzzword of the day that got sent down to the government to all the news media agencies and now you're going to regurgitate it back to me like it's your opinion? I'm like, you've never done anything for this planet outside of doing yourself and maybe you bought a toilet paper roll for your next neighbor at some point in time and that was awesome.

Harry:
*Laughter*.

Guy:
But like, it wasn't even two ply.

Ilan:
It wasn't a two ply!!

Harry:
*Laughter*.

Guy:
I mean, seriously, it's like..we gotta take a step back and think again, who are we going to be, because the way that we're being is a virus right now. Like, everybody's scared of Ebola, we're Ebola.

Harry:
Yeah, we're the biggest virus on the planet right now.

Guy:
Yeah exactly. I love it. Everyone's so scared of Ebola, but we've had two cases so far. Heart disease is killing 3 quarters of a million people year, nope, we're not going to do shit about that, though. We're not scared about that, we don't have to worry about that.

Ilan:
It's a good fear thing.

Guy:
Yeah, it's a good fear thing. Again, everybody take a step back. Who are we being? Who do we want to be? Is this what we're made for? I mean, I look inside myself and I wanna vomit when I think about the way we're operating today and if you don't feel that way, that's fine too. You know, contrast in every part of life, but for those of you guys who are looking at the world like I'm looking at and there's so much beauty in it and we're destroying a lot of that and it doesn't mean it's all going bye, bye. There's a lot of shit too and the shit is always going to be there, but I think we've come a time where we've evolve as a specie, but the archetypes of the past.

If you wanna think about it like the software has evolved, the hardware hasn't evolved, so the software can't run on this hardware anymore, so the archetypes of the past, they don't allow for the possibility of what we've created. What people are creating everywhere all the time, all these movements, so I only see one solution. Shit's got to go.

Harry:
A complete reboot.

Guy:
I'm not talking about a revolution. I'm not talking about violence or pitch folks in the streets and fires are burning, leave it all the way it is, just let's stop giving power to what we've given power to and it's just a choice. Tomorrow we wake up and we go, “You guys have no power.” That really is it. They have no power.

Harry:
Yeah.

Guy:
None. You don't show up to work, what are they going to do? Government shuts down also. That's it. It doesnt' take very much, guys, it really doesn't, so we just have to choose.

Harry:
That's profound stuff, man, and it's a lot to chew on and a lot to think about, like, the paradigm shift that's going to be required for people to move from a mindset where they get their information spoon feed to them about what they should be doing next and who they should be to and who they should be following/voting for to understanding that all of that stuff is actually a facade and it's just the stuff that's been prompt in our face to keep us from critical thinking which is what we need to in order to affect the change that we wanna see.

Guy:
Absolutely. Very well said.

Harry:
Powerful stuff. So, I don't know, I”m at a critical junction here. Like, I could go, keep going, man. This is amazing, man. I'm having a blast. I'm telling you, man. This is awesome.

Ilan/Guy:
*Laughter*.

Harry:
Maybe we should do another one. I've got a million question for you guys.

Ilan:
We can do another one.

Harry:
*Laughter*. I wanna go..

Guy:
I'm open to one more question.

Harry:
Yeah, let's, oh man, gotta make it good here. What I love about the show, what I love about you guys is your transparency and your vulnerability. So, talk a little bit about why you have decided.. you talk about some personal shit on the podcast, you know, you had a fantastic episodes 53 to 56 with Stella Grizont and she was with Happiness..I forget the name of the site that's she's with. You guys vibed immediately and you had her back on and you went deep there and you've gone deep in your beer talks. So, talk about the importance of being vulnerable

Guy:
Oof, wow. You just started a whole other podcast.

Ilan:
Man, if you were to pick one question, that's a good question. Okay, why don't you go, Guy.

Guy:
Me? I was about to go get myself a Quest bar while you go talk. *Laughter*.

Ilan/Harry:
*Laughter*.

Guy:
Man, oh my god. I mean, in my life, you know, so I talked to you guys about the depression, suicide stuff. At 19 I cracked completely opened. I went from being one way to a completely different way. Like, transformation took a second for me. I'm not saying like the path of transformation is very long, it's going to be a life long journey, but from going to thinking one way to a completely way I think took about one second of my life. I remember the exact moment, the smell, the sound, everything at the exact moment happened and it literally from my right foot lifting to my right foot landing, by the time that foot landed, I knew I would never be the same human being again. It was that quick.

It was just like that. It was like an epiphany, because of the landmarks. So, what I learned that weekend was sharing the deep dark stuff that no body wants to share is the access to something. What that access was I didn't know at the time, but as I went down that road, I realized everybody that I talked to had something in common, which was…you know when we give each other compliments? It's so funny, because we strive for it, like we work for them, like we want the acknowledgment and then we get it and we go, “Mmm. I don't know what it.”

Like, we contract the moment we hear it, it makes us feel really weird, and I'm like, “What is that weird ass phenomenon, because I know in the back in my head, “Pay attention to me, pay attention to me, pay attention to me.” Then I get it and I don't want that attention. Like, I want attention in a specific way, it's weird. I'm like, okay, what's going on over there?” So, for me, the way I'd distinguish was I had this little voice in my head that when someone would tell me that my greatness or talk about my greatness, it would be like some version of, “If you really knew me, then you wouldn't be saying that.”

I've shared this with countless people and everybody has that look that you just had on your face of like they get wide eyed of that recognition of holy fuck I'm doing that too and I've noticed that everybody has this thing, so whatever that is, what I've learned, is the story you have about you, your identity story and somewhere in there there's some deep dark shit that you never tell anybody about, because your impression is, if I tell you some deep dark shit, you won't wanna be around me anymore. Like, that would be no, no, you'd cut it off.

Like, that's the funny part about that, when you share that deep dark stuff, the exact opposite of what you think is going to happen, happens. Instead of people moving away, they come in like beers to honey. It's fucking insane. Then you're like, now you have to deal with the fact that everybody wants to be around you all the time and they didn't run for the hills because they're like I'm going to tell this thing and run for the hills. They'll be sticking to you and you'll be like holy shit, so that was what it became access to.

You wanna earn listening, you wanna impact people, you don't even have a choice. Vulnerability is the access to impacting people. The reason why politicians can't impact the world, there's zero vulnerability. Do you know why they stand behind the desk? Because if you saw what their feet and hands were doing, you'd know they'd be lying the entire time. If you put a glass desk in front of a politician, no body would vote for that asshole, ever, because the whole thing is one big lie. It has to be. To be in that situation you have to lie. So, for me, it's if you're willing to be, and that's why we curse by the way. I know it gets people the wrong way I know most people are like, “These guys are great, but they curse too much.” You know what? Fuck you. I am my own person.

Harry:
*Laughter*.

Guy:
If that's all it takes to rub you the wrong way, Jesus has thou.

Harry:
This message is not for you.

Guy:
I don't have problem with any religion…Anyway, my point is, you wanna impact people, you wanna feel empowerment, you wanna feel connected, you wanna understand what self-expression truly feels like and what it is to garner power and be a responsible for that, if you're not vulnerable, you haven't even gotten a shot in hell. It's, you know, the mission of transformation of spiritually is to just shed the layers.

I mean, ayahuasca, talk about something that sheds your layers, it's like a fucking coming out party in there. You are like a snake with skin pealing off. You gotta, yeah, we see the future as vulnerability and story tellers, you know, we met (*74:28) who is an incredible guy. You should definitely look into him if you don't know him. Ex-NFL player. He just believes in the dream society.

The people in the future who are going to lead are really great story tellers and you don't have to look very far into the past to see that those are the people that people followed back then too. Shamans and all those people, what were they? Everybody sat around the fires and the guy who told the stories, that was the leader of tribe. So, it's like, I think we're moving back into tribe mentality. The DNA is waking up again, thank God, and we're like we gotta go back to what's important, which is passing down information through storytelling through vulnerability.

Harry:
Awesome, very well said.

Ilan:
I was going to say something very, very similar, so I'll keep it really short. I just believe that the only way of ever seeing human beings connect is when all the bullshit is stripped away. That's the only true connection. That's in love relationships both intimate, friends, all that stuff. Think about the way you are with your closest friends. There's no bullshit. There is no filter. That's why they're your closest friends. Intimate relationships only happen when people are stripped down and the most vulnerable.

You ever wanna see how unvulnerable you are, put yourself in an intimate relationships, because like, as soon as you are in that partnership, every which way that you are not that is what's going to show up. That's basically your barrier into feeling love, connection, all that kind of stuff.

So, for us, it's important out of function, like the people that we want in our Satori Prime, we call it the Satori Prime family, are people that see us a 100% who we are. We've been to live events, we do a lot of videos, all this stuff, and the one thing everyone says is, “I can't believe you're this accessible when I'm just sitting with you at a bar.” I'm like, well, because I'm the same idiot that you watch on YouTube or listen to on a podcast. I can not..It's too much damn energy to try and pretend to be someone that I'm not. I figured that out a long time ago.

Guy:
PREACH! Peach. Peach, brother, preach!

Ilan:
And once you get that, then the whole part about, Guy said like, people like me, don't like me, respect me, don't respect me, if you don't for whatever reason, that's fine. We're all entitled to our own opinions. I have no problems with you whatsoever. I love you just as much as I did before you told me that, you're just not someone that I'm going to rely my message to at this moment. You might shift or something might happened in your life and all of a sudden you're like, wow, you know what, something they said back then blah blah blah, but you know, the only way that I know how to relate to people is by doing that and it is vitally important to us, it will never change, we will be the rawest, most insane people in a room and we love it, like, that's who we are.

Guy:
Again, just going back to that one idea, when you are who you are, whether you're depressed or angry, if you own it, if there's a real to it like a vulnerability to it, authenticity to it, you can still make a profound difference. We had a mentor when I was 20 or 21 or 23 at the time, yeah he lives out here in Carlsbad. He used to say, “I'm an asshole, but I make a huge and profound difference..” for whatever it was, millions of people, thousands of people, and it's true.

We all have those qualities, but so what? How is that you're going to judge somebody? We all have our moments. I'm a fucking asshole a few times a week on a good week, you know?

Ilan:
*Laughter*.

Guy:
But, I learned how to own that stuff, I learned how to take responsibility for that stuff so people aren't left with my junk at the end of the day. When I was young, I threw up on you and I'd be like, “You clean it.” You know? Now if I throw up on you, I'm like, “Shit, sorry. Ego attack, you know, I just lost it for a moment there. Like it's never going to happen again and if it does I gotta own it again.” That's it. That's all that's required of you. So, it's not like, people just think these shifts have to be really big. They don't have to be big, they just have to be consistent. You know? Anyway..Again, we can talk about this for hours man.

Harry:
*Laughter*. On that note, we are bringing this roller coaster ride to a halt for now. Catch our breath and we have to figure out when the next ride is going to be. This was absolutely freaking fantastic, man. The energy is popable in this conversation and I'm so excited to have had a chance to talk to you guys and like, it's exactly what you said, the guys I thought I was going to be speaking to as a res-function of listening to the podcast is exactly the same motherfuckers who I'm talking to here and they haven't changed one bit.

Ilan:
Be yourself, be yourself. That's what the world is waiting for.

Guy:
Harry, thank you so much, man.

Harry:
Yeah, I had a blast. So like, if people want to keep up with Satori Prime, what's the best place they can find you?

Ilan:
Two easiest places first and foremost SatoriPrime.com just check it out, we have so much free content about everything you could possibly want. Life, business, relationships, whatever it's all there, and also the podcast, Performance Enhancing Podcast. You can search for us on iTunes or Stitcher or you can even find the link in our SatoriPrime.com page.

Guy:
Yeah yeah.

Harry:
So Ilan, my brother, Guy, my brother, thank you so much. This was fantastic.

Ilan:
Thank you so much.

Harry:
I want you guys to have a fantastic day, man.

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